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6 Recipes to Enjoy on St. Patrick's Day Slideshow

6 Recipes to Enjoy on St. Patrick's Day Slideshow


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Maryse Chevriere

Guinness is cleverly used as a glazed for these sweet and addictive cookies.

Triple Chocolate Cookies with Sea Salt and Guinness

Maryse Chevriere

Guinness is cleverly used as a glazed for these sweet and addictive cookies.

Guinness and Ice Cream

Istock/dny59

A delicious dessert recipe that’s from Colman Andrews', The Daily Meal's editorial director, cookbook, The Country Cooking of Ireland.

Guinness Braised Beef Short Ribs, Drunken Prunes, Cipollini Onions, and Root Vegetables

The nutty, malty quality of Guinness is nicely offset by the sweetness of the prunes in this twist on meat and potatoes.

Bette’s Braised Red Cabbage with Apple

Braising cabbage softens it and the addition of tart apples adds a slight sweetness to this recipe.

Irish Soda Bread with Dried Cranberries, Apricots, and Ginger

This recipe is a sweet and tangy twist on traditional Irish soda bread.


Three corned beef recipes, none of them hash, to enjoy this St. Patrick's Day

For many of us, corned beef tastes delicious every day of the year. But its popularity soars on St. Patrick's Day &mdash Irish heritage optional.

Like green beer, this holiday food tradition is largely a phenomenon in the United States. In fact, today's corned beef is more Jewish than Irish. It's rare to encounter it in Ireland.

The British are credited for corning beef in the 17th century by curing fresh beef with salt for preservation. Shaylyn Esposito, writing in the Smithsonian Magazine (March 15, 2013) explains that the term "corned" comes from the size of the salt kernels used in the curing.

A million Irish people immigrated to this country during Ireland's Great Famine, frequently landing first in New York alongside Jewish immigrants from Eastern and Central Europe. Here, the Irish embraced beef &mdash especially corned beef. However, Esposito explains that "the corned beef the Irish immigrants ate was much different than that produced in Ireland 200 years prior. The Irish immigrants almost solely bought their meat from kosher butchers. And what we think of today as Irish corned beef is actually Jewish corned beef thrown into a pot with cabbage and potatoes."

Since brisket is a tough cut of beef, it is well-suited to the salting and cooking that transforms it into tender, tasty corned beef. This all explains why today corned beef can be found in Irish-American households and Jewish delis alike.

Armed with these kernels of knowledge, it's time to get cooking. You can simmer corned beef roasts (sold in cry-o-vac packages in the meat case) with a little Irish stout and fresh orange slices in the oven. Or you can simply enjoy a warm corned beef sandwich. And leftover corned beef tastes great tucked into creamy, cheesy pasta.

Maple-Glazed Corned Beef With Orange and Stout

Baked corned beef with caramelized onions and carrots, prepared by chef Shannon Kinsella. / Photo by Abel Uribe/Chicago Tribune/TNS

Total time: 4 hours (25 minutes prep time, 3 1/2 hours cook time

Notes: Look in the meat case for seasoned corned beef that's ready to cook. A whole corned beef brisket weighs 6 to 8 pounds. A 3-pound flat cut makes for easy slicing. You can prepare the recipe through step 3 in a slow-cooker set on low. Cooking time will be 6 to 8 hours add the carrots after 4 hours.

For the corned beef:

1 flat cut, corned beef brisket (about 3 pounds)

2 medium-size sweet onions, cut into 8 wedges

2 ribs celery, roughly chopped

1 medium-size orange, ends trimmed, halved, thinly sliced

3 large cloves garlic, sliced

1 teaspoon black peppercorns

8 long skinny carrots (about 12 ounces) peeled, cut crosswise in half

1 tablespoon molasses, optional

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Horseradish sauce, for serving

1. Heat oven to 325 degrees. Put corned beef, onion, celery, orange, garlic, peppercorns, cloves and bay leaves into a large (6-quart) Dutch oven. Add beer and then cold water to cover everything by 1 inch. Heat to a gentle simmer over medium heat.

2. Place a piece of parchment paper over the top of the pot. Add the lid, and carefully slide into the oven. Bake covered, stirring once or twice, for 2 hours.

3. Add carrots to pot cover and continue baking until a fork inserted into meat releases easily, 1 to 1 1/2 more hours. Use a slotted spoon to scoop out and discard the orange slices. (Recipe can be prepared to this point and refrigerated in the liquid, covered, up to 2 days. Rewarm everything over medium-low heat on top of the stove.)

4. To make the glaze, combine maple syrup, molasses (if using), Dijon mustard and pepper in a small saucepan. Heat to a simmer. Cook and stir until mixture reduces to a thick syrup consistency, about 1 minute. Remove from heat.

5. Heat oven to 375 degrees on convection or 400 degrees on conventional setting. Use tongs to transfer cooked corned beef to a foil-lined baking pan. Use a slotted spoon to transfer carrots and onion pieces around the meat in the baking pan. (You can strain the broth and save it for the base of a meaty soup.)

6. Drizzle the maple glaze over the meat and the vegetables. Bake, until bubbling hot, about 10 minutes. Transfer corned beef to a cutting board. Slice thinly, across the grain. Arrange on serving platter pile the carrots and onions alongside the sliced meat. Pass the horseradish sauce.

Cheesy Pasta With Caramelized Onions and Corned Beef

Corned beef with cheese pasta, prepared by chef Shannon Kinsella. / Photo by Abel Uribe/Chicago Tribune/TNS

Total time: 45 minutes (25 minutes prep time, 20 minutes cook time)

Notes: I prefer not to use preshredded cheese here because the added anti-caking ingredients interfere with a creamy melt. It's easy to shred chunks of cheese on the large holes of a four-sided grater. If desired, transfer the finished dish to a buttered baking dish and top with buttered bread crumbs bake until crumbs are crisp and golden.

8 ounces (about 2 1/2 cups) mezzi rigatoni or fusilli pasta

1 tablespoon butter or bacon fat

1/2 large sweet onion, very thinly sliced

1/2 cup half-and-half or heavy (whipping) cream

1 teaspoon hot red pepper sauce, plus more for serving

1 cup (3 ounces) shredded white cheddar cheese

1 cup (3 ounces) shredded Gruyere or Swiss cheese

1 1/2 cups (4 to 5 ounces) small dice corned beef (or smoky ham)

Chopped parsley and green onions, for garnish

Have all ingredients ready and set near the cooking surface.

Heat a large pot of salted water to boil over high heat. Add pasta. Cook, stirring often, until al dente (nearly tender but not soft when tasted), 8 to 10 minutes. Scoop out 1 cup of the cooking liquid, and reserve it. Drain the pasta well, and let stand while you make the sauce.

While the pasta cooks, heat olive oil and butter or bacon fat in medium-size saucepan over medium heat. Add onion cook and stir until onion is golden brown, 5 to 8 minutes.

Sprinkle flour over onions cook and stir for 1 minute. Whisk in nonfat milk and half-and-half (or whipping cream) and salt. Cook, whisking constantly until milk thickens, about 3 minutes. Remove from heat, and season with hot sauce.

When pasta is done, stir both cheeses into the hot white sauce. Add drained pasta and corned beef mix gently. Taste for salt. Gently stir in enough of the reserved pasta cooking liquid to loosen up the mixture. Serve right away sprinkled with parsley and onions.

Warm Corned Beef Sandwich With Black Pepper Mayo

A corned beef sandwich, prepared by chef Shannon Kinsella. / Photo by Abel Uribe/Chicago Tribune/TNS

Total time: 10 minutes (8 minutes prep time, 1 minute cook time)

Notes: You can toast the rye bread if desired, but I like the texture of untoasted bread with warm corned beef.

1 teaspoon prepared horseradish

1/2 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper

4 slices hearty rye bread

6 to 8 ounces very thinly sliced corned beef

Very thinly sliced red onion, well rinsed, optional

Mix mayonnaise, horseradish and black pepper in small bowl. Spread the mixture over one side of 4 rye bread slices.

Fold the corned beef slices in half, and pile them onto a microwave-safe plate. Cover with plastic, and microwave on high just long enough to make the meat steamy hot, 45 to 60 seconds.

Arrange half of the corned beef on two slices of the bread. Top with a few red onion slices if desired. Top with a second bread slice. Serve while warm.


Three corned beef recipes to enjoy this St. Patrick’s Day that aren’t hash

Published March 10. 2021 12:01AM

JeanMarie Brownson, The Daily Meal

For many of us, corned beef tastes delicious every day of the year. But its popularity soars on Saint Patrick’s Day — Irish heritage optional.

Like green beer, this holiday food tradition is largely a phenomenon in the United States. In fact, today’s corned beef is more Jewish than Irish. It’s rare to encounter it in Ireland.

The British are credited for corning beef in the 17th century by curing fresh beef with salt for preservation. Shaylyn Esposito, writing in the Smithsonian Magazine (March 15, 2013), explains that the term 𠇌orned” comes from the size of the salt kernels used in the curing. For tax reasons, Irish salt was less expensive than British salt, so cattle was shipped to Ireland to be corned. Irish corned beef was exported to Europe and the Americas until the end of the 18th century when the demand declined as the North American colonies produced their own.

A million Irish people immigrated to this country during Ireland’s Great Famine, frequently landing first in New York alongside Jewish immigrants from Eastern and Central Europe. Here, the Irish embraced beef — especially corned beef. However, Esposito explains that “the corned beef the Irish immigrants ate was much different than that produced in Ireland 200 years prior. The Irish immigrants almost solely bought their meat from kosher butchers. And what we think of today as Irish corned beef is actually Jewish corned beef thrown into a pot with cabbage and potatoes.”

Since brisket is a tough cut of beef, it is well suited to the salting and cooking that transforms it into tender, tasty corned beef. This all explains why today corned beef can be found in Irish-American households and Jewish delis alike.

Armed with these kernels of knowledge, it’s time to get cooking. You can simmer corned beef roasts (sold in cry-o-vac packages in the meat case) with a little Irish stout and fresh orange slices in the oven. The whole house will smell delicious, hopefully providing a pleasant distraction when working in our home offices. At dinnertime, a peppery maple glaze will make the whole dish shine.

When time is short, you can channel a delicatessen and simply enjoy a warm corned beef sandwich, made from deli-sliced, fully cooked corned beef on rye bread with zesty horseradish-spiked mayonnaise.

And leftover corned beef tastes great tucked into creamy, cheesy pasta for a warming winter meal no matter where you live.

MAPLE-GLAZED CORNED BEEF WITH ORANGE AND STOUT

25 m (prepare time) + 3-1/2 hours (cook time)

Notes: Look in the meat case for seasoned corned beef that’s ready to cook. A whole corned beef brisket weighs 6 to 8 pounds. A 3-pound flat cut makes for easy slicing. You can prepare the recipe through step 2 in a slow-cooker set on low. Cooking time will be 6 to 8 hours add the carrots after 4 hours.

1 flat cut, corned beef brisket (about 3 pounds)

2 medium-size sweet onions, cut into 8 wedges

2 ribs celery, roughly chopped

1 medium-size orange, ends trimmed, halved, thinly sliced

3 large cloves garlic, sliced

1 teaspoon black peppercorns

8 long skinny carrots (about 12 ounces) peeled, cut crosswise in half

1 tablespoon molasses, optional

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Horseradish sauce, for serving

1. Heat oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit. Put corned beef, wedges from 2 medium-size onions, 2 chopped celery ribs, 1 thinly sliced orange, 3 cloves sliced garlic, 1 teaspoon black peppercorns, 1/2 teaspoon whole cloves and 2 bay leaves into a large (6-quart) Dutch oven. Add 1 cup stout beer and then cold water to cover everything by 1 inch. Heat to a gentle simmer over medium heat.

2. Place a piece of parchment paper over the top of the pot. Add the lid and carefully slide into the oven. Bake covered, stirring once or twice, for 2 hours.

3. Add carrots to pot cover and continue baking until a fork inserted into meat releases easily, 1 to 1-1/2 more hours. Use a slotted spoon to scoop out and discard the orange slices. (Recipe can be prepared to this point and refrigerated in the liquid, covered, up to 2 days. Rewarm everything over medium-low heat on top of the stove.)

4. To make the glaze, mix [1/4] cup maple syrup, 1 tablespoon molasses (if using), 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard and 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper in a small saucepan. Heat to a simmer. Cook and stir until mixture reduces to a thick syrup consistency, about 1 minute. Remove from heat.

5. Heat oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit on convection or 400 degrees Fahrenheit on conventional setting. Use tongs to transfer cooked corned beef to a foil-lined baking pan. Use a slotted spoon to transfer carrots and onion pieces around the meat in the baking pan. (You can strain the broth and save it for the base of a meaty soup.)

6. Drizzle the maple glaze over the meat and the vegetables. Bake, until bubbling hot, about 10 minutes. Transfer corned beef to a cutting board. Slice thinly, across the grain. Arrange on serving platter pile the carrots and onions alongside the sliced meat. Pass the horseradish sauce.

CHEESY PASTA WITH CARAMELIZED ONIONS AND CORNED BEEF

25 m (prepare time) + 20 m (cook time)

Notes: I prefer not to use pre-shredded cheese here because the added anti-caking ingredients interfere with a creamy melt. It’s easy to shred chunks of cheese on the large holes of a four-sided grater. If desired, transfer the finished dish to a buttered baking dish and top with buttered bread crumbs bake until crumbs are crisp and golden.

8 ounces (about 2-1/2 cups) mezzi rigatoni or fusilli pasta

1 tablespoon butter or bacon fat

1/2 large sweet onion, very thinly sliced

1/2 cup half-and-half or heavy (whipping) cream

1 teaspoon hot red pepper sauce, plus more for serving

1 cup (3 ounces) shredded white cheddar cheese

1 cup (3 ounces) shredded Gruyere or Swiss cheese

1-1/2 cups (4 to 5 ounces) small dice corned beef (or smoky ham)

Chopped parsley and green onions, for garnish

1. Have all ingredients ready and set near the cooking surface.

2. Heat a large pot of salted water to boil over high heat. Add 8 ounces pasta. Cook, stirring often, until al dente (nearly tender but not soft when tasted), 8 to 10 minutes. Scoop out 1 cup of the cooking liquid and reserve it. Drain the pasta well and let stand while you make the sauce.

3. While the pasta cooks, heat 2 tablespoons olive oil and 1 tablespoon butter or bacon fat in medium-size saucepan over medium heat. Add 1/2 large sweet onion, thinly slices cook and stir until onion is golden brown, 5 to 8 minutes.

4. Sprinkle 1/3 cup flour over onions cook and stir for 1 minute. Whisk in 2 cups nonfat milk and 1/2 cup half-and-half (or whipping cream) and 1/2 teaspoon salt. Cook, whisking constantly until milk thickens, about 3 minutes. Remove from heat and season with 1 teaspoon red pepper hot sauce.

5. When pasta is done, stir both cheeses into the hot white sauce. Add drained pasta and corned beef mix gently. Taste for salt. Gently stir in enough of the reserved pasta cooking liquid to loosen up the mixture. Serve right away sprinkled with parsley and onions.

WARM CORNED BEEF SANDWICH WITH BLACK PEPPER MAYO

8 m (prepare time) + 1 m (cook time)

Notes: You can toast the rye bread if desired, but I like the texture of untoasted bread with warm corned beef.

1 teaspoon prepared horseradish

1/2 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper

4 slices hearty rye bread

6 to 8 ounces very thinly sliced corned beef

Very thinly sliced red onion, well rinsed, optional

1. Mix 3 tablespoons mayonnaise, 1 teaspoon prepared horseradish and 1/2 teaspoon fresh black pepper in small bowl. Spread the mixture over one side of 4 rye bread slices.

2. Fold the 6 to 8 ounces corned beef slices in half and pile them onto a microwave-safe plate. Cover with plastic and microwave on high (100 percent power) just long enough to make the meat steamy hot, 45 to 60 seconds.

3. Arrange half of the corned beef on two slices of the bread. Top with a few red onion slices if desired. Top with a second bread slice. Serve while warm.


Chicken Pesto Pasta

This next recipe is filling and flavorful. It’s big on taste, but won’t take too much of your time making it. You can serve it as is, with bread, or with a salad. You can adjust the amount of pesto sauce you’re going to use on the pasta depending on your taste. Follow these instructions and try out this recipe.

  • 1 pack of bow tie pasta
  • 2 cloves of minced garlic
  • ½ cup of pesto sauce
  • ½ cup of oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes, drain and cut into strips
  • 1 teaspoon of olive oil
  • 2 boneless chicken breasts, chopped into bite-sized pieces
  • crushed red pepper flakes
  1. Boil water in a large pot. Lightly salt the water.
  2. Add the bow tie pasta and cook for about 8 up to 10 minutes until the pasta is al dente.
  3. Once done, drain the pasta.
  4. In a large skillet, heat the oil over medium heat.
  5. Saute the garlic until it’s tender. Add the chicken.
  6. Season the chicken with crushed red pepper flakes to your taste.
  7. Cook the chicken until it’s cooked through and golden. Set aside.
  8. Combine the pasta, chicken, pesto sauce, and sun-dried tomatoes in a large bowl.

Make sure to coat the pasta and chicken with the sauce evenly. Serve as is or with your preferred side dishes or entrees.

Watch this video tutorial to get an idea on how to cook this dish.

You can also try this alternate recipe from Food52.com here.


To get started, grab a semi-sweet baking bar, hot chocolate mix, mini marshmallows, and green sprinkles. The spherical chocolate mold will be key as well!

To melt the chocolate, you can either follow the directions on the package to melt the chocolate in the microwave in a microwave-safe bowl OR you can set up a double boiler to melt the chocolate.

Once the chocolate is melted, remove the candy molds from the freezer and place on a small baking sheet. Next, add 1 tbsp of the chocolate into the mold. Use your spoon to move the chocolate around the inside of the mold. Make sure that you apply the chocolate evenly.

Repeat the process for the rest of the molds. When you are done, lightly tap the mold(s) to get any air bubbles out.

Place the mold on the baking sheet back into the freezer and let the chocolate spheres set up for 10 – 15 minutes.

Remove the chocolate bomb molds from the freezer. Carefully remove the chocolate from the molds.

Heat a plate in the microwave for approximately 60 seconds. Remove from the microwave then as you work on each mold, turn one of the bomb halves upside down and place it directly onto the hot plate for 5 to 10 seconds. You just want the rim to gently melt.

Fill the molds with 1 tbsp of the hot cocoa mix and top with mini marshmallows. Then repeat the step to melt the rim of the bomb you are using to top your hot chocolate bomb.

CAREFULLY press the two halves together. Repeat the process until all of the chocolate bombs are done.

Use the leftover chocolate and drizzle that over the top of your hot chocolate bombs. Top with the sprinkles.

How to Use Hot Chocolate Bombs

To use the bomb, place it in a large mug, pour warm milk over it and stir until everything is mixed together and enjoy!


Other Ideas

There are many celebrations of Irish culture related to St. Patrick's Day. Enjoying all things green - and wearing green - are certainly two of them. Many folks enjoy corned beef and cabbage on March 17, which is wonderful. But this St. Patrick's Day beef stew is a terrific option.

Here are a few more recipes that I think you'll enjoy with your stew on St. Patrick's Day, but all of these are delicious any time of year!

Be sure to give a star rating to the recipes you make from the Crinkled Cookbook. I always love hearing from you. Sharing is great too! Use the buttons after the recipe to text it with just one click or send it to family and friends on Pinterest and Facebook. Enjoy.


Creative ideas for St. Patrick’s Day | I’m Lovin’ It Features

‘Tis the season to be Irish! For St. Patrick’s Day, I didn’t have to dig very deep into a pot of golden ideas from this weeks party! There were so many holiday crafts projects, St. Patrick-themed activities for kids, and yummy St. Patrick’s Day recipes — all in the spirit of the Irish holiday

Kick off the green festivities by trying a fun and easy St. Patrick’s Day craft. Learn how to make a stenciled shamrock pillow or Full ‘O Luck t-shirt. Let the kids enjoy St. Patrick’s Day with a scavenger hunt or Leprechaun Clue Book. Be sure to treat yourself and family to a sweet green dessert or beverage……. and of course, remember to wear green on March 17.

18 Creative Green Ideas that caught my eye!

I hope these creative ideas and St. Patrick’s Day crafts bring a little luck to you this time of year!

Thank you for sharing so many wonderful projects, recipes and crafts again this week ! You can still link up thru Sunday evening or come back next week and link up for another I’m Lovin’ It Friday, who knows maybe next week I will be featuring you!


Mint Sugar Scrub

Materials :

Directions :

Add about a 1/4 inch of soap to the bottom of the jar and pour the sugar in. Stir in a little bit more soap until the sugar is completely incorporated and the mixture is a nice consistency – not too thick, and not runny.

Add a pretty ribbon or piece of Washi tape to decorate the jar.

Directions for use: Massage the scrub over damp skin to exfoliate. Rinse with warm water.


10 St. Patrick's Day Snacks and Foods For Your Family to Enjoy

St. Patrick's Day Snacks and Foods

In addition to wearing something green so you don't get pinched on St. Patrick's Day, it's also fun to eat St. Patrick's Day foods. Here's a list of fun St. Patrick's Day snacks and other foods so you can make your grocery shopping list and prepare for your fun St. Patrick's Day plans.

1. Trail Mix always makes a good snack, but it's more fun to eat it with a St. Patrick's Day twist. Sarah and Jessica over at Pretty Providence share their recipe that only requires 3 ingredients. Take a look here and give it a try. You can change out the candy colors to coordinate with any holiday or special event theme.

2. Oh my goodness, these are just too cute. Turn Nutter Butter cookies into leprechaun faces! Vera Sweeney over at Lady and the Blog shows us how she made hers. Once you see these cookies, you will want to make them . . . and of course . . . eat them.

3. Looking for a St. Patrick's Day breakfast idea? How about these amazing looking cinnamon rolls with shamrock sprinkles? They look delicious! Check them out at Craftibilities.

4. Remember the Rice Krispies treats your mom used to make? My mother made Rice Krispies treats for us quiet often while I was growing up. They were always so good especially when they were still warm. Here's a recipe for Rice Krispies treats St. Patrick's Day style. Check them out at Classy Clutter.

5. Would you like to send your kids to school with a fun St. Patrick's Day lunch? Here's a cute idea and it looks like it won't take too much time in the kitchen on a busy weekday morning. Here's a great home packed lunch idea from Lakeview Farms.

6. Who loves red velvet cake? I know I do! How about a green velvet cake? Actually, how about a green velvet cheesecake cake? Try this recipe from Lori at Recipe Girl.

7. I'm sure you've probably enjoyed peppermint bark during the Christmas season. Why not enjoy leprechaun bark on St. Patrick's Day? Check out this colorful version of leprechaun bark from This N' That with Olivia.

8. The Lucky Charms folks have shared a recipe for Rainbow Lucky Charms Frosted Cookie Bars on their website. Check out this easy and fun recipe here.

9. Do you enjoy pancakes? Have a stack of green Lucky Charms pancakes. Here's the recipe from Betty Crocker.

10. Want to avoid using green food coloring? Melissa at Bless This Mess has compiled a list of naturally green foods. Check them out here.

St. Patrick's Day Snacks and Foods

Since Spring is only a few days away, you might also like this cute coffee filter flower planter craft.


Recipe: Pistachio Two-Bite Brownies

Ingredients

1 package of store-bought mini brownies
1 package soft cream cheese
1 envelope Dream Whip powder
1 1/2 cups milk
1 package pistachio pudding mix
pistachios

Instructions

Using a spoon or hand-held mixer, whip the cream cheese until smooth. Mix together with the powder, milk and pudding mix. Blend until smooth. Place generous dollops onto the mini-brownies then top with coarsely-chopped pistachios. Enjoy!

St. Patrick’s Day is a great excuse to wear green and enjoy green libations! So decorate those treats using these free printables.

Download the PDF file and print on card stock. Use the flags for cupcake toppers and hors d’oeuvres picks. Use the circles for badges, stickers or round cupcake toppers. These printables will have you exclaiming “Kiss Me, I’m Irish” as you enjoy your green beer and the other fun traditions of St. Patrick’s Day!

To download this free St. Patrick’s Day printable, click on the image below or the link at the bottom.

And check out more great free printables here, including freebies for Easter, Earth Day and Mother’s Day.


Watch the video: Το Αντίδοτο στο Χάραγμα - Πάτερ Ελπίδιος (May 2022).