New recipes

I Went to Butterball University, and This Is What I Learned

I Went to Butterball University, and This Is What I Learned



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

I’m basically a turkey master at this point

Kathleen Collins / The Daily Meal

I learned how to make this gorgeous turkey.

I’ve cooked a Thanksgiving turkey twice before, for the holiday in 2015 and 2016, and I was mostly successful. My skin turned out crispy, my breast meat was moist, and I think my thyme butter was a great way to flavor the bird. But my dark meat was a little too… let’s say juicy, and I couldn’t carve that darn turkey to save my life!

It’s safe to say I had a thing or two to learn about cooking a Thanksgiving turkey. So when I had the chance to enroll in a crash course at Butterball University taught by real life helpers from the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line, I was thrilled.

My crash course in Thanksgiving Turkey 101 taught me a few tips and tricks on cooking and presenting the perfect bird, and it would be selfish to keep them to myself! So here are five things you need to know before cooking your bird this year:

How to defrost a turkey
You can’t just pop a frozen turkey into the oven, and the Butterball turkey experts said that defrosting questions were among their most frequent inquiries. So how do you defrost a bird? Ideally, it’s done in the refrigerator. For every 4 pounds of turkey, your bird needs one day in the fridge, but a defrosted turkey will actually be fine in the fridge for three days before cooking. So Butterball has declared the Thursday before Thanksgiving (which falls on November 16 this year) National Thaw Day. Remove that bird from the freezer, keep it in its wrapper, put it on a sheet pan breast side up, and put the sheet pan on the lowest shelf in your fridge.

But what if you forgot to put your bird in the fridge a week before Turkey Day? You can do a cold water thaw! Once again, leave the turkey in its wrapper, fill up your sink with cold water, and submerge the turkey breast side down. Replace the cold water every 30 minutes to avoid the bird getting above 40 degrees and making everyone at your table sick.

Have you defrosted your turkey and find that the cavity is still a little icy? No worries! Just run cold water through the cavity until the ice melts.

Basting isn’t necessarily your friend
Did you ever wonder why the turkey that was supposed to be ready in 3 1/2 hours is taking all day? It may be because you’re basting the bird. Every time you open your oven, you lose 25 degrees of heat. Flavor your bird with whatever seasonings you desire before putting it in the oven and keep that stove shut.

Temperature is everything
Turkey can go from a hazardous food source to a dry protein that can’t be saved no matter how much delicious gravy you pour on it really quickly. So remember to cook your bird to temperature. That means the breast should be cooked to 165 degrees and the thigh to 180 degrees. Since the thigh needs to come to a higher temperature than the breast, tent the breast with aluminum foil two-thirds of the way through cooking to deflect the heat.

If you’ve stuffed your bird with stuffing, then the only temperature that truly matters is that stuffing. In order to be safe to eat, it needs to be at least 165 degrees. If it’s significantly cooler than the rest of the bird, avoid overcooking your turkey by taking the stuffing out of the turkey, transferring it to a separate pan, and finishing it on its own.

Turkey Carving 101
It’s easy to make a mistake when carving a turkey. So what do you do? First, you want to clear everyone else from the kitchen. Carving a turkey is serious business, and doing it at the table or in front of only people will only lead to performance anxiety.

After you ensure you’re alone, lift your turkey out of its roasting pan using silicon mitts. If you don’t have silicon mitts, insert a wooden spoon into the cavity to lift the bird and hold it using a paper towel. Using a straight knife with a bit of flexibility, cut the thigh and bring it away from the rest of the bird. If it’s properly cooked, this should be done easily. Separate the leg from the thigh and put the entire leg on your turkey platter (for the cavemen in your family). Then cut the thigh along the bone. Don’t worry about making the dark meat pretty! Then, remove the breast from the bone, getting as close to the carcass as possible. To avoid shredding your meat, cut across the grain. Save the wing meat and the carcass for turkey stock and turkey soup the next day!

How to make an Instagrammable bird
When serving your carved turkey on a platter, don’t worry about the presentation. It’s OK for it to have flaws! But how do you get a turkey as stunning as this one?

For a shiny, golden skin, brush your turkey with vegetable oil before popping it in to the oven. Butter and olive oil have lower burning temperatures, so they’re more likely to give you an uneven coating and dark spots. Before taking your turkey away to carve it, prep a platter with whatever you happen to have in the kitchen! Fresh herbs, figs, seasonal grapes, and various lettuces can all make for a stunning presentation. Kale in particular is sturdy enough to withstand the heat of a turkey and makes for a festive platter. Just be sure to start with a white platter for clean presentation, and you’re good to go. No matter which way you cook your turkey, Thanksgiving is a rustic holiday, so you don’t need to make your platter minimalist and modern to make it look stunning.

Carolyn Menyes is the entertain and holidays editor at The Daily Meal. Her favorite Thanksgiving tradition is watching people bowl frozen turkeys at canned goods on Fox 8 News in Cleveland. Follow her on Instagram and Twitter.


I Went to Butterball University, and This Is What I Learned - Recipes

The Butterball Turkey Talk-Line is available to smooth ruffled feathers by providing one-on-one turkey advice. Every November and December, the Talk-Line's more than 50 professionally trained home economists respond to more than 100,000 inquiries on virtually every turkey topic, from thawing to carving. Below are the ten most commonly asked questions from recent years.

1. WHAT'S THE BEST WAY TO THAW A TURKEY? (13,276 questions)

Refrigerator thawing is recommended. However, if short on time, submerge the turkey in cold water. Thawing turkey at room temperature allows bacterial growth and is not recommended.

Refrigerator Thawing:
Thaw breast side up in its unopened wrapper on a tray in the refrigerator. Allow at least one day of thawing for every four pounds of turkey.


Cold Water Thawing:
Place breast down in its unopened wrapper in cold water to cover. Change the water every 30 minutes to keep surface cold. Estimate minimum thawing time to be 30 minutes per pound for whole turkey.

2. HOW DO YOU RECOMMEND HANDLING A TURKEY SO IT'S SAFE TO EAT? (12,929 questions)

Follow these food safety guidelines. Refer to specific categories for additional directions.

  • Thaw frozen turkey in the refrigerator or cold water.
  • Keep thawed or fresh turkey in a refrigerator.
  • Prevent juices from dripping onto other foods in the refrigerator by placing wrapped turkey on a tray.
  • Thawed turkey may be kept in a refrigerator up to four days before cooking.
  • Roast fresh turkey as soon as possible, but no later than the use by date on the package.
  • Place raw poultry on non-porous surfaces these are easy to clean. It is recommended that two cutting boards are used: one strictly to cut raw meats and the other for ready-to-eat foods, such as breads, fruits, and vegetables. If using one cutting board, be sure it is used for raw meats only. Cutting boards should be washed thoroughly in hot, soapy water before and after each use, and allowed to air dry or patted dry with fresh paper towels.
  • Use paper towels, not cloth, to dry off turkey and wipe up juices.
  • Combine stuffing ingredients and stuff turkey just before roasting, not the night before.
  • Wash hands, work surfaces and utensils touched by raw poultry and its juices with hot, soapy water.
  • Use cooking methods that allow turkey to reach an internal temperature of 140°F in less than four hours. Avoid using low roasting temperatures or partial cooking methods.
  • Use a meat thermometer to determine turkey's doneness.
  • Store turkey, stuffing, gravy, broth and other cooked foods properly within two hours after cooking.

The Butterball Open Pan Roasting Method will consistently create a juicy, tender, golden brown, picture-perfect turkey.

  • Place thawed or fresh turkey, breast up, on a flat rack in a shallow pan, 2 to 2-1/2 inches deep.
  • Insert oven-safe meat thermometer into the thickest part of the thigh.
  • Brush or rub skin with oil to prevent drying of the skin and to enhance the golden color.
  • Place in a preheated 325°F oven.
  • When the skin is a light golden color and the turkey is about two-thirds done, shield the breast loosely with a tent of lightweight foil to prevent overcooking of the breast.
  • Use this roasting schedule as a guideline start checking for doneness 1/2 hour before recommended end times:
    Net Weight (in pounds) (in hours)
    10 to 18 lbs.: 3 to 3-1/2 hours, unstuffed 3-3/4 to 4-1/2 hours, stuffed
    18 to 22 lbs.: 3-1/2 to 4 4-1/2 hours, unstuffed to 4-1/2 to 5 hours, stuffed
    22 to 24 lbs.: 4 to 4-1/2 hours, unstuffed 5 to 5-1/2 hours, stuffed
    24 to 30 lbs.: 4-1/2 to 5 hours, unstuffed 5-1/2 to 6-1/4 hours, stuffed
  • Turkey is done when the meat thermometer reaches the following temperatures:
    • 180 to 185°F deep in the thigh also, juices should be clear, not pink when thigh muscle is pierced deeply.
    • 170 to 175°F in the thickest part of the breast, just above the rib bones.
    • 160 to 165°F in the center of the stuffing, if turkey is stuffed.
    • If stuffed, the tip of the meat thermometer should be placed inside the stuffed cavity of the turkey. If unstuffed, the tip of the meat thermometer should be placed in the thigh muscle just above and beyond the lower part of the thigh bone, but not touching the bone, and pointing toward the body.
    • If using an oven-safe meat thermometer, insert the thermometer prior to placing the turkey in the oven and leave in while the turkey is roasting. Turn the thermometer so it can be read while the turkey is in the oven.
    • If using an instant-read meat thermometer, do not leave the thermometer in the turkey during roasting.

    Within two hours after roasting, remove stuffing from turkey and carve the meat off the bones, then store in refrigerator or freezer.

    • Wrap turkey slices and stuffing separately and use within three days.
    • Wrap in heavy foil, freezer wrap or place in freezer container for optimum flavor, use stuffing within one month and turkey within two months.
    • 180 to 185°F deep in the thigh also, juices should be clear, not pink when thigh muscle is pierced deeply.
    • 160 °F in the center of the stuffing, if turkey is stuffed.

    Generations of Americans have been enjoying turkeys -- stuffed and unstuffed. Whether you choose to stuff your turkey or cook stuffing in a casserole dish is a matter of personal preference. As with any preparation involving raw food ingredients, it's important to carefully follow proper food safety and handling procedures to ensure a safe turkey every time. For consumers who choose to stuff their turkey, we recommend the following four guidelines.

    • Prepare stuffing just before placing in turkey. Use only cooked ingredients in stuffing -- saute vegetables, use only cooked meats and seafood (oysters) and use pasteurized egg products instead of raw eggs. Place prepared stuffing in turkey just before roasting. Do not stuff the turkey the night before roasting.
    • Stuff both neck and body cavities of completely thawed turkey, allowing 1/2 to 3/4 cup of stuffing per pound of turkey. Do not pack stuffing tightly in turkey.
    • Always use a meat thermometer. The turkey is done when the thigh temperature reaches 180°F on a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh next to body, not touching bone. Move the meat thermometer to the center of stuffing temperature should be 160°F. When the stuffed turkey is done, remove turkey from oven and let turkey with stuffing stand 15 minutes. This stand time allows the stuffing temperature to reach 165°F.for an added measure of safety
    • If you have additional questions call the experts at the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line at 1-800-323-4848. Specially trained home economists will be ready and waiting to take America's calls beginning November 1 at 8 a.m. CST.
    • When the turkey is cooked on an outdoor grill, water smoker or by fast cook methods where the turkey typically gets done faster than the stuffing, it is recommended that the turkey not be stuffed.
    • Remove original plastic wrapper from thawed or fresh turkey.
    • Remove the neck and giblets from the body and neck cavities.
    • Drain juices and blot turkey dry with paper towels.
    • Stuff the turkey (optional) just before roasting ingredients may be prepared earlier, but keep moist and dry ingredients separate and combine just before stuffing.
    • Return legs to tucked position, if untucked for cleaning or stuffing.
    • Insert oven-safe meat thermometer into the deepest part of the thigh.
    • Brush with oil to prevent drying of the skin.
    • Follow roasting directions that come with every Butterball turkey.
    • Selecting a fresh or frozen turkey is your choice.
    • Fresh turkeys need no thawing and are ready to cook.
    • Frozen turkeys can be purchased months in advance, but plan enough thawing time before roasting.
    • Fresh, non-basted Butterball Turkeys are all-natural.
    • The breast meat of frozen Butterball Turkeys has been deep-basted for juiciness.

    No. Basting throughout the roasting process is unnecessary. Pouring juices over a turkey's surface while it roasts will not make the meat juicier. The liquid penetrates only about 1/8 to 1/4 of an inch beneath the skin and most of the juice will run off into the pan. Opening the oven door periodically to baste a turkey can cool the oven and possibly lengthen the roasting time. Before roasting, lightly coat the turkey's skin with oil, shortening or vegetable cooking spray to prevent the skin from drying.


    I Went to Butterball University, and This Is What I Learned - Recipes

    The Butterball Turkey Talk-Line is available to smooth ruffled feathers by providing one-on-one turkey advice. Every November and December, the Talk-Line's more than 50 professionally trained home economists respond to more than 100,000 inquiries on virtually every turkey topic, from thawing to carving. Below are the ten most commonly asked questions from recent years.

    1. WHAT'S THE BEST WAY TO THAW A TURKEY? (13,276 questions)

    Refrigerator thawing is recommended. However, if short on time, submerge the turkey in cold water. Thawing turkey at room temperature allows bacterial growth and is not recommended.

    Refrigerator Thawing:
    Thaw breast side up in its unopened wrapper on a tray in the refrigerator. Allow at least one day of thawing for every four pounds of turkey.


    Cold Water Thawing:
    Place breast down in its unopened wrapper in cold water to cover. Change the water every 30 minutes to keep surface cold. Estimate minimum thawing time to be 30 minutes per pound for whole turkey.

    2. HOW DO YOU RECOMMEND HANDLING A TURKEY SO IT'S SAFE TO EAT? (12,929 questions)

    Follow these food safety guidelines. Refer to specific categories for additional directions.

    • Thaw frozen turkey in the refrigerator or cold water.
    • Keep thawed or fresh turkey in a refrigerator.
    • Prevent juices from dripping onto other foods in the refrigerator by placing wrapped turkey on a tray.
    • Thawed turkey may be kept in a refrigerator up to four days before cooking.
    • Roast fresh turkey as soon as possible, but no later than the use by date on the package.
    • Place raw poultry on non-porous surfaces these are easy to clean. It is recommended that two cutting boards are used: one strictly to cut raw meats and the other for ready-to-eat foods, such as breads, fruits, and vegetables. If using one cutting board, be sure it is used for raw meats only. Cutting boards should be washed thoroughly in hot, soapy water before and after each use, and allowed to air dry or patted dry with fresh paper towels.
    • Use paper towels, not cloth, to dry off turkey and wipe up juices.
    • Combine stuffing ingredients and stuff turkey just before roasting, not the night before.
    • Wash hands, work surfaces and utensils touched by raw poultry and its juices with hot, soapy water.
    • Use cooking methods that allow turkey to reach an internal temperature of 140°F in less than four hours. Avoid using low roasting temperatures or partial cooking methods.
    • Use a meat thermometer to determine turkey's doneness.
    • Store turkey, stuffing, gravy, broth and other cooked foods properly within two hours after cooking.

    The Butterball Open Pan Roasting Method will consistently create a juicy, tender, golden brown, picture-perfect turkey.

    • Place thawed or fresh turkey, breast up, on a flat rack in a shallow pan, 2 to 2-1/2 inches deep.
    • Insert oven-safe meat thermometer into the thickest part of the thigh.
    • Brush or rub skin with oil to prevent drying of the skin and to enhance the golden color.
    • Place in a preheated 325°F oven.
    • When the skin is a light golden color and the turkey is about two-thirds done, shield the breast loosely with a tent of lightweight foil to prevent overcooking of the breast.
    • Use this roasting schedule as a guideline start checking for doneness 1/2 hour before recommended end times:
      Net Weight (in pounds) (in hours)
      10 to 18 lbs.: 3 to 3-1/2 hours, unstuffed 3-3/4 to 4-1/2 hours, stuffed
      18 to 22 lbs.: 3-1/2 to 4 4-1/2 hours, unstuffed to 4-1/2 to 5 hours, stuffed
      22 to 24 lbs.: 4 to 4-1/2 hours, unstuffed 5 to 5-1/2 hours, stuffed
      24 to 30 lbs.: 4-1/2 to 5 hours, unstuffed 5-1/2 to 6-1/4 hours, stuffed
    • Turkey is done when the meat thermometer reaches the following temperatures:
      • 180 to 185°F deep in the thigh also, juices should be clear, not pink when thigh muscle is pierced deeply.
      • 170 to 175°F in the thickest part of the breast, just above the rib bones.
      • 160 to 165°F in the center of the stuffing, if turkey is stuffed.
      • If stuffed, the tip of the meat thermometer should be placed inside the stuffed cavity of the turkey. If unstuffed, the tip of the meat thermometer should be placed in the thigh muscle just above and beyond the lower part of the thigh bone, but not touching the bone, and pointing toward the body.
      • If using an oven-safe meat thermometer, insert the thermometer prior to placing the turkey in the oven and leave in while the turkey is roasting. Turn the thermometer so it can be read while the turkey is in the oven.
      • If using an instant-read meat thermometer, do not leave the thermometer in the turkey during roasting.

      Within two hours after roasting, remove stuffing from turkey and carve the meat off the bones, then store in refrigerator or freezer.

      • Wrap turkey slices and stuffing separately and use within three days.
      • Wrap in heavy foil, freezer wrap or place in freezer container for optimum flavor, use stuffing within one month and turkey within two months.
      • 180 to 185°F deep in the thigh also, juices should be clear, not pink when thigh muscle is pierced deeply.
      • 160 °F in the center of the stuffing, if turkey is stuffed.

      Generations of Americans have been enjoying turkeys -- stuffed and unstuffed. Whether you choose to stuff your turkey or cook stuffing in a casserole dish is a matter of personal preference. As with any preparation involving raw food ingredients, it's important to carefully follow proper food safety and handling procedures to ensure a safe turkey every time. For consumers who choose to stuff their turkey, we recommend the following four guidelines.

      • Prepare stuffing just before placing in turkey. Use only cooked ingredients in stuffing -- saute vegetables, use only cooked meats and seafood (oysters) and use pasteurized egg products instead of raw eggs. Place prepared stuffing in turkey just before roasting. Do not stuff the turkey the night before roasting.
      • Stuff both neck and body cavities of completely thawed turkey, allowing 1/2 to 3/4 cup of stuffing per pound of turkey. Do not pack stuffing tightly in turkey.
      • Always use a meat thermometer. The turkey is done when the thigh temperature reaches 180°F on a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh next to body, not touching bone. Move the meat thermometer to the center of stuffing temperature should be 160°F. When the stuffed turkey is done, remove turkey from oven and let turkey with stuffing stand 15 minutes. This stand time allows the stuffing temperature to reach 165°F.for an added measure of safety
      • If you have additional questions call the experts at the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line at 1-800-323-4848. Specially trained home economists will be ready and waiting to take America's calls beginning November 1 at 8 a.m. CST.
      • When the turkey is cooked on an outdoor grill, water smoker or by fast cook methods where the turkey typically gets done faster than the stuffing, it is recommended that the turkey not be stuffed.
      • Remove original plastic wrapper from thawed or fresh turkey.
      • Remove the neck and giblets from the body and neck cavities.
      • Drain juices and blot turkey dry with paper towels.
      • Stuff the turkey (optional) just before roasting ingredients may be prepared earlier, but keep moist and dry ingredients separate and combine just before stuffing.
      • Return legs to tucked position, if untucked for cleaning or stuffing.
      • Insert oven-safe meat thermometer into the deepest part of the thigh.
      • Brush with oil to prevent drying of the skin.
      • Follow roasting directions that come with every Butterball turkey.
      • Selecting a fresh or frozen turkey is your choice.
      • Fresh turkeys need no thawing and are ready to cook.
      • Frozen turkeys can be purchased months in advance, but plan enough thawing time before roasting.
      • Fresh, non-basted Butterball Turkeys are all-natural.
      • The breast meat of frozen Butterball Turkeys has been deep-basted for juiciness.

      No. Basting throughout the roasting process is unnecessary. Pouring juices over a turkey's surface while it roasts will not make the meat juicier. The liquid penetrates only about 1/8 to 1/4 of an inch beneath the skin and most of the juice will run off into the pan. Opening the oven door periodically to baste a turkey can cool the oven and possibly lengthen the roasting time. Before roasting, lightly coat the turkey's skin with oil, shortening or vegetable cooking spray to prevent the skin from drying.


      I Went to Butterball University, and This Is What I Learned - Recipes

      The Butterball Turkey Talk-Line is available to smooth ruffled feathers by providing one-on-one turkey advice. Every November and December, the Talk-Line's more than 50 professionally trained home economists respond to more than 100,000 inquiries on virtually every turkey topic, from thawing to carving. Below are the ten most commonly asked questions from recent years.

      1. WHAT'S THE BEST WAY TO THAW A TURKEY? (13,276 questions)

      Refrigerator thawing is recommended. However, if short on time, submerge the turkey in cold water. Thawing turkey at room temperature allows bacterial growth and is not recommended.

      Refrigerator Thawing:
      Thaw breast side up in its unopened wrapper on a tray in the refrigerator. Allow at least one day of thawing for every four pounds of turkey.


      Cold Water Thawing:
      Place breast down in its unopened wrapper in cold water to cover. Change the water every 30 minutes to keep surface cold. Estimate minimum thawing time to be 30 minutes per pound for whole turkey.

      2. HOW DO YOU RECOMMEND HANDLING A TURKEY SO IT'S SAFE TO EAT? (12,929 questions)

      Follow these food safety guidelines. Refer to specific categories for additional directions.

      • Thaw frozen turkey in the refrigerator or cold water.
      • Keep thawed or fresh turkey in a refrigerator.
      • Prevent juices from dripping onto other foods in the refrigerator by placing wrapped turkey on a tray.
      • Thawed turkey may be kept in a refrigerator up to four days before cooking.
      • Roast fresh turkey as soon as possible, but no later than the use by date on the package.
      • Place raw poultry on non-porous surfaces these are easy to clean. It is recommended that two cutting boards are used: one strictly to cut raw meats and the other for ready-to-eat foods, such as breads, fruits, and vegetables. If using one cutting board, be sure it is used for raw meats only. Cutting boards should be washed thoroughly in hot, soapy water before and after each use, and allowed to air dry or patted dry with fresh paper towels.
      • Use paper towels, not cloth, to dry off turkey and wipe up juices.
      • Combine stuffing ingredients and stuff turkey just before roasting, not the night before.
      • Wash hands, work surfaces and utensils touched by raw poultry and its juices with hot, soapy water.
      • Use cooking methods that allow turkey to reach an internal temperature of 140°F in less than four hours. Avoid using low roasting temperatures or partial cooking methods.
      • Use a meat thermometer to determine turkey's doneness.
      • Store turkey, stuffing, gravy, broth and other cooked foods properly within two hours after cooking.

      The Butterball Open Pan Roasting Method will consistently create a juicy, tender, golden brown, picture-perfect turkey.

      • Place thawed or fresh turkey, breast up, on a flat rack in a shallow pan, 2 to 2-1/2 inches deep.
      • Insert oven-safe meat thermometer into the thickest part of the thigh.
      • Brush or rub skin with oil to prevent drying of the skin and to enhance the golden color.
      • Place in a preheated 325°F oven.
      • When the skin is a light golden color and the turkey is about two-thirds done, shield the breast loosely with a tent of lightweight foil to prevent overcooking of the breast.
      • Use this roasting schedule as a guideline start checking for doneness 1/2 hour before recommended end times:
        Net Weight (in pounds) (in hours)
        10 to 18 lbs.: 3 to 3-1/2 hours, unstuffed 3-3/4 to 4-1/2 hours, stuffed
        18 to 22 lbs.: 3-1/2 to 4 4-1/2 hours, unstuffed to 4-1/2 to 5 hours, stuffed
        22 to 24 lbs.: 4 to 4-1/2 hours, unstuffed 5 to 5-1/2 hours, stuffed
        24 to 30 lbs.: 4-1/2 to 5 hours, unstuffed 5-1/2 to 6-1/4 hours, stuffed
      • Turkey is done when the meat thermometer reaches the following temperatures:
        • 180 to 185°F deep in the thigh also, juices should be clear, not pink when thigh muscle is pierced deeply.
        • 170 to 175°F in the thickest part of the breast, just above the rib bones.
        • 160 to 165°F in the center of the stuffing, if turkey is stuffed.
        • If stuffed, the tip of the meat thermometer should be placed inside the stuffed cavity of the turkey. If unstuffed, the tip of the meat thermometer should be placed in the thigh muscle just above and beyond the lower part of the thigh bone, but not touching the bone, and pointing toward the body.
        • If using an oven-safe meat thermometer, insert the thermometer prior to placing the turkey in the oven and leave in while the turkey is roasting. Turn the thermometer so it can be read while the turkey is in the oven.
        • If using an instant-read meat thermometer, do not leave the thermometer in the turkey during roasting.

        Within two hours after roasting, remove stuffing from turkey and carve the meat off the bones, then store in refrigerator or freezer.

        • Wrap turkey slices and stuffing separately and use within three days.
        • Wrap in heavy foil, freezer wrap or place in freezer container for optimum flavor, use stuffing within one month and turkey within two months.
        • 180 to 185°F deep in the thigh also, juices should be clear, not pink when thigh muscle is pierced deeply.
        • 160 °F in the center of the stuffing, if turkey is stuffed.

        Generations of Americans have been enjoying turkeys -- stuffed and unstuffed. Whether you choose to stuff your turkey or cook stuffing in a casserole dish is a matter of personal preference. As with any preparation involving raw food ingredients, it's important to carefully follow proper food safety and handling procedures to ensure a safe turkey every time. For consumers who choose to stuff their turkey, we recommend the following four guidelines.

        • Prepare stuffing just before placing in turkey. Use only cooked ingredients in stuffing -- saute vegetables, use only cooked meats and seafood (oysters) and use pasteurized egg products instead of raw eggs. Place prepared stuffing in turkey just before roasting. Do not stuff the turkey the night before roasting.
        • Stuff both neck and body cavities of completely thawed turkey, allowing 1/2 to 3/4 cup of stuffing per pound of turkey. Do not pack stuffing tightly in turkey.
        • Always use a meat thermometer. The turkey is done when the thigh temperature reaches 180°F on a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh next to body, not touching bone. Move the meat thermometer to the center of stuffing temperature should be 160°F. When the stuffed turkey is done, remove turkey from oven and let turkey with stuffing stand 15 minutes. This stand time allows the stuffing temperature to reach 165°F.for an added measure of safety
        • If you have additional questions call the experts at the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line at 1-800-323-4848. Specially trained home economists will be ready and waiting to take America's calls beginning November 1 at 8 a.m. CST.
        • When the turkey is cooked on an outdoor grill, water smoker or by fast cook methods where the turkey typically gets done faster than the stuffing, it is recommended that the turkey not be stuffed.
        • Remove original plastic wrapper from thawed or fresh turkey.
        • Remove the neck and giblets from the body and neck cavities.
        • Drain juices and blot turkey dry with paper towels.
        • Stuff the turkey (optional) just before roasting ingredients may be prepared earlier, but keep moist and dry ingredients separate and combine just before stuffing.
        • Return legs to tucked position, if untucked for cleaning or stuffing.
        • Insert oven-safe meat thermometer into the deepest part of the thigh.
        • Brush with oil to prevent drying of the skin.
        • Follow roasting directions that come with every Butterball turkey.
        • Selecting a fresh or frozen turkey is your choice.
        • Fresh turkeys need no thawing and are ready to cook.
        • Frozen turkeys can be purchased months in advance, but plan enough thawing time before roasting.
        • Fresh, non-basted Butterball Turkeys are all-natural.
        • The breast meat of frozen Butterball Turkeys has been deep-basted for juiciness.

        No. Basting throughout the roasting process is unnecessary. Pouring juices over a turkey's surface while it roasts will not make the meat juicier. The liquid penetrates only about 1/8 to 1/4 of an inch beneath the skin and most of the juice will run off into the pan. Opening the oven door periodically to baste a turkey can cool the oven and possibly lengthen the roasting time. Before roasting, lightly coat the turkey's skin with oil, shortening or vegetable cooking spray to prevent the skin from drying.


        I Went to Butterball University, and This Is What I Learned - Recipes

        The Butterball Turkey Talk-Line is available to smooth ruffled feathers by providing one-on-one turkey advice. Every November and December, the Talk-Line's more than 50 professionally trained home economists respond to more than 100,000 inquiries on virtually every turkey topic, from thawing to carving. Below are the ten most commonly asked questions from recent years.

        1. WHAT'S THE BEST WAY TO THAW A TURKEY? (13,276 questions)

        Refrigerator thawing is recommended. However, if short on time, submerge the turkey in cold water. Thawing turkey at room temperature allows bacterial growth and is not recommended.

        Refrigerator Thawing:
        Thaw breast side up in its unopened wrapper on a tray in the refrigerator. Allow at least one day of thawing for every four pounds of turkey.


        Cold Water Thawing:
        Place breast down in its unopened wrapper in cold water to cover. Change the water every 30 minutes to keep surface cold. Estimate minimum thawing time to be 30 minutes per pound for whole turkey.

        2. HOW DO YOU RECOMMEND HANDLING A TURKEY SO IT'S SAFE TO EAT? (12,929 questions)

        Follow these food safety guidelines. Refer to specific categories for additional directions.

        • Thaw frozen turkey in the refrigerator or cold water.
        • Keep thawed or fresh turkey in a refrigerator.
        • Prevent juices from dripping onto other foods in the refrigerator by placing wrapped turkey on a tray.
        • Thawed turkey may be kept in a refrigerator up to four days before cooking.
        • Roast fresh turkey as soon as possible, but no later than the use by date on the package.
        • Place raw poultry on non-porous surfaces these are easy to clean. It is recommended that two cutting boards are used: one strictly to cut raw meats and the other for ready-to-eat foods, such as breads, fruits, and vegetables. If using one cutting board, be sure it is used for raw meats only. Cutting boards should be washed thoroughly in hot, soapy water before and after each use, and allowed to air dry or patted dry with fresh paper towels.
        • Use paper towels, not cloth, to dry off turkey and wipe up juices.
        • Combine stuffing ingredients and stuff turkey just before roasting, not the night before.
        • Wash hands, work surfaces and utensils touched by raw poultry and its juices with hot, soapy water.
        • Use cooking methods that allow turkey to reach an internal temperature of 140°F in less than four hours. Avoid using low roasting temperatures or partial cooking methods.
        • Use a meat thermometer to determine turkey's doneness.
        • Store turkey, stuffing, gravy, broth and other cooked foods properly within two hours after cooking.

        The Butterball Open Pan Roasting Method will consistently create a juicy, tender, golden brown, picture-perfect turkey.

        • Place thawed or fresh turkey, breast up, on a flat rack in a shallow pan, 2 to 2-1/2 inches deep.
        • Insert oven-safe meat thermometer into the thickest part of the thigh.
        • Brush or rub skin with oil to prevent drying of the skin and to enhance the golden color.
        • Place in a preheated 325°F oven.
        • When the skin is a light golden color and the turkey is about two-thirds done, shield the breast loosely with a tent of lightweight foil to prevent overcooking of the breast.
        • Use this roasting schedule as a guideline start checking for doneness 1/2 hour before recommended end times:
          Net Weight (in pounds) (in hours)
          10 to 18 lbs.: 3 to 3-1/2 hours, unstuffed 3-3/4 to 4-1/2 hours, stuffed
          18 to 22 lbs.: 3-1/2 to 4 4-1/2 hours, unstuffed to 4-1/2 to 5 hours, stuffed
          22 to 24 lbs.: 4 to 4-1/2 hours, unstuffed 5 to 5-1/2 hours, stuffed
          24 to 30 lbs.: 4-1/2 to 5 hours, unstuffed 5-1/2 to 6-1/4 hours, stuffed
        • Turkey is done when the meat thermometer reaches the following temperatures:
          • 180 to 185°F deep in the thigh also, juices should be clear, not pink when thigh muscle is pierced deeply.
          • 170 to 175°F in the thickest part of the breast, just above the rib bones.
          • 160 to 165°F in the center of the stuffing, if turkey is stuffed.
          • If stuffed, the tip of the meat thermometer should be placed inside the stuffed cavity of the turkey. If unstuffed, the tip of the meat thermometer should be placed in the thigh muscle just above and beyond the lower part of the thigh bone, but not touching the bone, and pointing toward the body.
          • If using an oven-safe meat thermometer, insert the thermometer prior to placing the turkey in the oven and leave in while the turkey is roasting. Turn the thermometer so it can be read while the turkey is in the oven.
          • If using an instant-read meat thermometer, do not leave the thermometer in the turkey during roasting.

          Within two hours after roasting, remove stuffing from turkey and carve the meat off the bones, then store in refrigerator or freezer.

          • Wrap turkey slices and stuffing separately and use within three days.
          • Wrap in heavy foil, freezer wrap or place in freezer container for optimum flavor, use stuffing within one month and turkey within two months.
          • 180 to 185°F deep in the thigh also, juices should be clear, not pink when thigh muscle is pierced deeply.
          • 160 °F in the center of the stuffing, if turkey is stuffed.

          Generations of Americans have been enjoying turkeys -- stuffed and unstuffed. Whether you choose to stuff your turkey or cook stuffing in a casserole dish is a matter of personal preference. As with any preparation involving raw food ingredients, it's important to carefully follow proper food safety and handling procedures to ensure a safe turkey every time. For consumers who choose to stuff their turkey, we recommend the following four guidelines.

          • Prepare stuffing just before placing in turkey. Use only cooked ingredients in stuffing -- saute vegetables, use only cooked meats and seafood (oysters) and use pasteurized egg products instead of raw eggs. Place prepared stuffing in turkey just before roasting. Do not stuff the turkey the night before roasting.
          • Stuff both neck and body cavities of completely thawed turkey, allowing 1/2 to 3/4 cup of stuffing per pound of turkey. Do not pack stuffing tightly in turkey.
          • Always use a meat thermometer. The turkey is done when the thigh temperature reaches 180°F on a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh next to body, not touching bone. Move the meat thermometer to the center of stuffing temperature should be 160°F. When the stuffed turkey is done, remove turkey from oven and let turkey with stuffing stand 15 minutes. This stand time allows the stuffing temperature to reach 165°F.for an added measure of safety
          • If you have additional questions call the experts at the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line at 1-800-323-4848. Specially trained home economists will be ready and waiting to take America's calls beginning November 1 at 8 a.m. CST.
          • When the turkey is cooked on an outdoor grill, water smoker or by fast cook methods where the turkey typically gets done faster than the stuffing, it is recommended that the turkey not be stuffed.
          • Remove original plastic wrapper from thawed or fresh turkey.
          • Remove the neck and giblets from the body and neck cavities.
          • Drain juices and blot turkey dry with paper towels.
          • Stuff the turkey (optional) just before roasting ingredients may be prepared earlier, but keep moist and dry ingredients separate and combine just before stuffing.
          • Return legs to tucked position, if untucked for cleaning or stuffing.
          • Insert oven-safe meat thermometer into the deepest part of the thigh.
          • Brush with oil to prevent drying of the skin.
          • Follow roasting directions that come with every Butterball turkey.
          • Selecting a fresh or frozen turkey is your choice.
          • Fresh turkeys need no thawing and are ready to cook.
          • Frozen turkeys can be purchased months in advance, but plan enough thawing time before roasting.
          • Fresh, non-basted Butterball Turkeys are all-natural.
          • The breast meat of frozen Butterball Turkeys has been deep-basted for juiciness.

          No. Basting throughout the roasting process is unnecessary. Pouring juices over a turkey's surface while it roasts will not make the meat juicier. The liquid penetrates only about 1/8 to 1/4 of an inch beneath the skin and most of the juice will run off into the pan. Opening the oven door periodically to baste a turkey can cool the oven and possibly lengthen the roasting time. Before roasting, lightly coat the turkey's skin with oil, shortening or vegetable cooking spray to prevent the skin from drying.


          I Went to Butterball University, and This Is What I Learned - Recipes

          The Butterball Turkey Talk-Line is available to smooth ruffled feathers by providing one-on-one turkey advice. Every November and December, the Talk-Line's more than 50 professionally trained home economists respond to more than 100,000 inquiries on virtually every turkey topic, from thawing to carving. Below are the ten most commonly asked questions from recent years.

          1. WHAT'S THE BEST WAY TO THAW A TURKEY? (13,276 questions)

          Refrigerator thawing is recommended. However, if short on time, submerge the turkey in cold water. Thawing turkey at room temperature allows bacterial growth and is not recommended.

          Refrigerator Thawing:
          Thaw breast side up in its unopened wrapper on a tray in the refrigerator. Allow at least one day of thawing for every four pounds of turkey.


          Cold Water Thawing:
          Place breast down in its unopened wrapper in cold water to cover. Change the water every 30 minutes to keep surface cold. Estimate minimum thawing time to be 30 minutes per pound for whole turkey.

          2. HOW DO YOU RECOMMEND HANDLING A TURKEY SO IT'S SAFE TO EAT? (12,929 questions)

          Follow these food safety guidelines. Refer to specific categories for additional directions.

          • Thaw frozen turkey in the refrigerator or cold water.
          • Keep thawed or fresh turkey in a refrigerator.
          • Prevent juices from dripping onto other foods in the refrigerator by placing wrapped turkey on a tray.
          • Thawed turkey may be kept in a refrigerator up to four days before cooking.
          • Roast fresh turkey as soon as possible, but no later than the use by date on the package.
          • Place raw poultry on non-porous surfaces these are easy to clean. It is recommended that two cutting boards are used: one strictly to cut raw meats and the other for ready-to-eat foods, such as breads, fruits, and vegetables. If using one cutting board, be sure it is used for raw meats only. Cutting boards should be washed thoroughly in hot, soapy water before and after each use, and allowed to air dry or patted dry with fresh paper towels.
          • Use paper towels, not cloth, to dry off turkey and wipe up juices.
          • Combine stuffing ingredients and stuff turkey just before roasting, not the night before.
          • Wash hands, work surfaces and utensils touched by raw poultry and its juices with hot, soapy water.
          • Use cooking methods that allow turkey to reach an internal temperature of 140°F in less than four hours. Avoid using low roasting temperatures or partial cooking methods.
          • Use a meat thermometer to determine turkey's doneness.
          • Store turkey, stuffing, gravy, broth and other cooked foods properly within two hours after cooking.

          The Butterball Open Pan Roasting Method will consistently create a juicy, tender, golden brown, picture-perfect turkey.

          • Place thawed or fresh turkey, breast up, on a flat rack in a shallow pan, 2 to 2-1/2 inches deep.
          • Insert oven-safe meat thermometer into the thickest part of the thigh.
          • Brush or rub skin with oil to prevent drying of the skin and to enhance the golden color.
          • Place in a preheated 325°F oven.
          • When the skin is a light golden color and the turkey is about two-thirds done, shield the breast loosely with a tent of lightweight foil to prevent overcooking of the breast.
          • Use this roasting schedule as a guideline start checking for doneness 1/2 hour before recommended end times:
            Net Weight (in pounds) (in hours)
            10 to 18 lbs.: 3 to 3-1/2 hours, unstuffed 3-3/4 to 4-1/2 hours, stuffed
            18 to 22 lbs.: 3-1/2 to 4 4-1/2 hours, unstuffed to 4-1/2 to 5 hours, stuffed
            22 to 24 lbs.: 4 to 4-1/2 hours, unstuffed 5 to 5-1/2 hours, stuffed
            24 to 30 lbs.: 4-1/2 to 5 hours, unstuffed 5-1/2 to 6-1/4 hours, stuffed
          • Turkey is done when the meat thermometer reaches the following temperatures:
            • 180 to 185°F deep in the thigh also, juices should be clear, not pink when thigh muscle is pierced deeply.
            • 170 to 175°F in the thickest part of the breast, just above the rib bones.
            • 160 to 165°F in the center of the stuffing, if turkey is stuffed.
            • If stuffed, the tip of the meat thermometer should be placed inside the stuffed cavity of the turkey. If unstuffed, the tip of the meat thermometer should be placed in the thigh muscle just above and beyond the lower part of the thigh bone, but not touching the bone, and pointing toward the body.
            • If using an oven-safe meat thermometer, insert the thermometer prior to placing the turkey in the oven and leave in while the turkey is roasting. Turn the thermometer so it can be read while the turkey is in the oven.
            • If using an instant-read meat thermometer, do not leave the thermometer in the turkey during roasting.

            Within two hours after roasting, remove stuffing from turkey and carve the meat off the bones, then store in refrigerator or freezer.

            • Wrap turkey slices and stuffing separately and use within three days.
            • Wrap in heavy foil, freezer wrap or place in freezer container for optimum flavor, use stuffing within one month and turkey within two months.
            • 180 to 185°F deep in the thigh also, juices should be clear, not pink when thigh muscle is pierced deeply.
            • 160 °F in the center of the stuffing, if turkey is stuffed.

            Generations of Americans have been enjoying turkeys -- stuffed and unstuffed. Whether you choose to stuff your turkey or cook stuffing in a casserole dish is a matter of personal preference. As with any preparation involving raw food ingredients, it's important to carefully follow proper food safety and handling procedures to ensure a safe turkey every time. For consumers who choose to stuff their turkey, we recommend the following four guidelines.

            • Prepare stuffing just before placing in turkey. Use only cooked ingredients in stuffing -- saute vegetables, use only cooked meats and seafood (oysters) and use pasteurized egg products instead of raw eggs. Place prepared stuffing in turkey just before roasting. Do not stuff the turkey the night before roasting.
            • Stuff both neck and body cavities of completely thawed turkey, allowing 1/2 to 3/4 cup of stuffing per pound of turkey. Do not pack stuffing tightly in turkey.
            • Always use a meat thermometer. The turkey is done when the thigh temperature reaches 180°F on a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh next to body, not touching bone. Move the meat thermometer to the center of stuffing temperature should be 160°F. When the stuffed turkey is done, remove turkey from oven and let turkey with stuffing stand 15 minutes. This stand time allows the stuffing temperature to reach 165°F.for an added measure of safety
            • If you have additional questions call the experts at the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line at 1-800-323-4848. Specially trained home economists will be ready and waiting to take America's calls beginning November 1 at 8 a.m. CST.
            • When the turkey is cooked on an outdoor grill, water smoker or by fast cook methods where the turkey typically gets done faster than the stuffing, it is recommended that the turkey not be stuffed.
            • Remove original plastic wrapper from thawed or fresh turkey.
            • Remove the neck and giblets from the body and neck cavities.
            • Drain juices and blot turkey dry with paper towels.
            • Stuff the turkey (optional) just before roasting ingredients may be prepared earlier, but keep moist and dry ingredients separate and combine just before stuffing.
            • Return legs to tucked position, if untucked for cleaning or stuffing.
            • Insert oven-safe meat thermometer into the deepest part of the thigh.
            • Brush with oil to prevent drying of the skin.
            • Follow roasting directions that come with every Butterball turkey.
            • Selecting a fresh or frozen turkey is your choice.
            • Fresh turkeys need no thawing and are ready to cook.
            • Frozen turkeys can be purchased months in advance, but plan enough thawing time before roasting.
            • Fresh, non-basted Butterball Turkeys are all-natural.
            • The breast meat of frozen Butterball Turkeys has been deep-basted for juiciness.

            No. Basting throughout the roasting process is unnecessary. Pouring juices over a turkey's surface while it roasts will not make the meat juicier. The liquid penetrates only about 1/8 to 1/4 of an inch beneath the skin and most of the juice will run off into the pan. Opening the oven door periodically to baste a turkey can cool the oven and possibly lengthen the roasting time. Before roasting, lightly coat the turkey's skin with oil, shortening or vegetable cooking spray to prevent the skin from drying.


            I Went to Butterball University, and This Is What I Learned - Recipes

            The Butterball Turkey Talk-Line is available to smooth ruffled feathers by providing one-on-one turkey advice. Every November and December, the Talk-Line's more than 50 professionally trained home economists respond to more than 100,000 inquiries on virtually every turkey topic, from thawing to carving. Below are the ten most commonly asked questions from recent years.

            1. WHAT'S THE BEST WAY TO THAW A TURKEY? (13,276 questions)

            Refrigerator thawing is recommended. However, if short on time, submerge the turkey in cold water. Thawing turkey at room temperature allows bacterial growth and is not recommended.

            Refrigerator Thawing:
            Thaw breast side up in its unopened wrapper on a tray in the refrigerator. Allow at least one day of thawing for every four pounds of turkey.


            Cold Water Thawing:
            Place breast down in its unopened wrapper in cold water to cover. Change the water every 30 minutes to keep surface cold. Estimate minimum thawing time to be 30 minutes per pound for whole turkey.

            2. HOW DO YOU RECOMMEND HANDLING A TURKEY SO IT'S SAFE TO EAT? (12,929 questions)

            Follow these food safety guidelines. Refer to specific categories for additional directions.

            • Thaw frozen turkey in the refrigerator or cold water.
            • Keep thawed or fresh turkey in a refrigerator.
            • Prevent juices from dripping onto other foods in the refrigerator by placing wrapped turkey on a tray.
            • Thawed turkey may be kept in a refrigerator up to four days before cooking.
            • Roast fresh turkey as soon as possible, but no later than the use by date on the package.
            • Place raw poultry on non-porous surfaces these are easy to clean. It is recommended that two cutting boards are used: one strictly to cut raw meats and the other for ready-to-eat foods, such as breads, fruits, and vegetables. If using one cutting board, be sure it is used for raw meats only. Cutting boards should be washed thoroughly in hot, soapy water before and after each use, and allowed to air dry or patted dry with fresh paper towels.
            • Use paper towels, not cloth, to dry off turkey and wipe up juices.
            • Combine stuffing ingredients and stuff turkey just before roasting, not the night before.
            • Wash hands, work surfaces and utensils touched by raw poultry and its juices with hot, soapy water.
            • Use cooking methods that allow turkey to reach an internal temperature of 140°F in less than four hours. Avoid using low roasting temperatures or partial cooking methods.
            • Use a meat thermometer to determine turkey's doneness.
            • Store turkey, stuffing, gravy, broth and other cooked foods properly within two hours after cooking.

            The Butterball Open Pan Roasting Method will consistently create a juicy, tender, golden brown, picture-perfect turkey.

            • Place thawed or fresh turkey, breast up, on a flat rack in a shallow pan, 2 to 2-1/2 inches deep.
            • Insert oven-safe meat thermometer into the thickest part of the thigh.
            • Brush or rub skin with oil to prevent drying of the skin and to enhance the golden color.
            • Place in a preheated 325°F oven.
            • When the skin is a light golden color and the turkey is about two-thirds done, shield the breast loosely with a tent of lightweight foil to prevent overcooking of the breast.
            • Use this roasting schedule as a guideline start checking for doneness 1/2 hour before recommended end times:
              Net Weight (in pounds) (in hours)
              10 to 18 lbs.: 3 to 3-1/2 hours, unstuffed 3-3/4 to 4-1/2 hours, stuffed
              18 to 22 lbs.: 3-1/2 to 4 4-1/2 hours, unstuffed to 4-1/2 to 5 hours, stuffed
              22 to 24 lbs.: 4 to 4-1/2 hours, unstuffed 5 to 5-1/2 hours, stuffed
              24 to 30 lbs.: 4-1/2 to 5 hours, unstuffed 5-1/2 to 6-1/4 hours, stuffed
            • Turkey is done when the meat thermometer reaches the following temperatures:
              • 180 to 185°F deep in the thigh also, juices should be clear, not pink when thigh muscle is pierced deeply.
              • 170 to 175°F in the thickest part of the breast, just above the rib bones.
              • 160 to 165°F in the center of the stuffing, if turkey is stuffed.
              • If stuffed, the tip of the meat thermometer should be placed inside the stuffed cavity of the turkey. If unstuffed, the tip of the meat thermometer should be placed in the thigh muscle just above and beyond the lower part of the thigh bone, but not touching the bone, and pointing toward the body.
              • If using an oven-safe meat thermometer, insert the thermometer prior to placing the turkey in the oven and leave in while the turkey is roasting. Turn the thermometer so it can be read while the turkey is in the oven.
              • If using an instant-read meat thermometer, do not leave the thermometer in the turkey during roasting.

              Within two hours after roasting, remove stuffing from turkey and carve the meat off the bones, then store in refrigerator or freezer.

              • Wrap turkey slices and stuffing separately and use within three days.
              • Wrap in heavy foil, freezer wrap or place in freezer container for optimum flavor, use stuffing within one month and turkey within two months.
              • 180 to 185°F deep in the thigh also, juices should be clear, not pink when thigh muscle is pierced deeply.
              • 160 °F in the center of the stuffing, if turkey is stuffed.

              Generations of Americans have been enjoying turkeys -- stuffed and unstuffed. Whether you choose to stuff your turkey or cook stuffing in a casserole dish is a matter of personal preference. As with any preparation involving raw food ingredients, it's important to carefully follow proper food safety and handling procedures to ensure a safe turkey every time. For consumers who choose to stuff their turkey, we recommend the following four guidelines.

              • Prepare stuffing just before placing in turkey. Use only cooked ingredients in stuffing -- saute vegetables, use only cooked meats and seafood (oysters) and use pasteurized egg products instead of raw eggs. Place prepared stuffing in turkey just before roasting. Do not stuff the turkey the night before roasting.
              • Stuff both neck and body cavities of completely thawed turkey, allowing 1/2 to 3/4 cup of stuffing per pound of turkey. Do not pack stuffing tightly in turkey.
              • Always use a meat thermometer. The turkey is done when the thigh temperature reaches 180°F on a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh next to body, not touching bone. Move the meat thermometer to the center of stuffing temperature should be 160°F. When the stuffed turkey is done, remove turkey from oven and let turkey with stuffing stand 15 minutes. This stand time allows the stuffing temperature to reach 165°F.for an added measure of safety
              • If you have additional questions call the experts at the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line at 1-800-323-4848. Specially trained home economists will be ready and waiting to take America's calls beginning November 1 at 8 a.m. CST.
              • When the turkey is cooked on an outdoor grill, water smoker or by fast cook methods where the turkey typically gets done faster than the stuffing, it is recommended that the turkey not be stuffed.
              • Remove original plastic wrapper from thawed or fresh turkey.
              • Remove the neck and giblets from the body and neck cavities.
              • Drain juices and blot turkey dry with paper towels.
              • Stuff the turkey (optional) just before roasting ingredients may be prepared earlier, but keep moist and dry ingredients separate and combine just before stuffing.
              • Return legs to tucked position, if untucked for cleaning or stuffing.
              • Insert oven-safe meat thermometer into the deepest part of the thigh.
              • Brush with oil to prevent drying of the skin.
              • Follow roasting directions that come with every Butterball turkey.
              • Selecting a fresh or frozen turkey is your choice.
              • Fresh turkeys need no thawing and are ready to cook.
              • Frozen turkeys can be purchased months in advance, but plan enough thawing time before roasting.
              • Fresh, non-basted Butterball Turkeys are all-natural.
              • The breast meat of frozen Butterball Turkeys has been deep-basted for juiciness.

              No. Basting throughout the roasting process is unnecessary. Pouring juices over a turkey's surface while it roasts will not make the meat juicier. The liquid penetrates only about 1/8 to 1/4 of an inch beneath the skin and most of the juice will run off into the pan. Opening the oven door periodically to baste a turkey can cool the oven and possibly lengthen the roasting time. Before roasting, lightly coat the turkey's skin with oil, shortening or vegetable cooking spray to prevent the skin from drying.


              I Went to Butterball University, and This Is What I Learned - Recipes

              The Butterball Turkey Talk-Line is available to smooth ruffled feathers by providing one-on-one turkey advice. Every November and December, the Talk-Line's more than 50 professionally trained home economists respond to more than 100,000 inquiries on virtually every turkey topic, from thawing to carving. Below are the ten most commonly asked questions from recent years.

              1. WHAT'S THE BEST WAY TO THAW A TURKEY? (13,276 questions)

              Refrigerator thawing is recommended. However, if short on time, submerge the turkey in cold water. Thawing turkey at room temperature allows bacterial growth and is not recommended.

              Refrigerator Thawing:
              Thaw breast side up in its unopened wrapper on a tray in the refrigerator. Allow at least one day of thawing for every four pounds of turkey.


              Cold Water Thawing:
              Place breast down in its unopened wrapper in cold water to cover. Change the water every 30 minutes to keep surface cold. Estimate minimum thawing time to be 30 minutes per pound for whole turkey.

              2. HOW DO YOU RECOMMEND HANDLING A TURKEY SO IT'S SAFE TO EAT? (12,929 questions)

              Follow these food safety guidelines. Refer to specific categories for additional directions.

              • Thaw frozen turkey in the refrigerator or cold water.
              • Keep thawed or fresh turkey in a refrigerator.
              • Prevent juices from dripping onto other foods in the refrigerator by placing wrapped turkey on a tray.
              • Thawed turkey may be kept in a refrigerator up to four days before cooking.
              • Roast fresh turkey as soon as possible, but no later than the use by date on the package.
              • Place raw poultry on non-porous surfaces these are easy to clean. It is recommended that two cutting boards are used: one strictly to cut raw meats and the other for ready-to-eat foods, such as breads, fruits, and vegetables. If using one cutting board, be sure it is used for raw meats only. Cutting boards should be washed thoroughly in hot, soapy water before and after each use, and allowed to air dry or patted dry with fresh paper towels.
              • Use paper towels, not cloth, to dry off turkey and wipe up juices.
              • Combine stuffing ingredients and stuff turkey just before roasting, not the night before.
              • Wash hands, work surfaces and utensils touched by raw poultry and its juices with hot, soapy water.
              • Use cooking methods that allow turkey to reach an internal temperature of 140°F in less than four hours. Avoid using low roasting temperatures or partial cooking methods.
              • Use a meat thermometer to determine turkey's doneness.
              • Store turkey, stuffing, gravy, broth and other cooked foods properly within two hours after cooking.

              The Butterball Open Pan Roasting Method will consistently create a juicy, tender, golden brown, picture-perfect turkey.

              • Place thawed or fresh turkey, breast up, on a flat rack in a shallow pan, 2 to 2-1/2 inches deep.
              • Insert oven-safe meat thermometer into the thickest part of the thigh.
              • Brush or rub skin with oil to prevent drying of the skin and to enhance the golden color.
              • Place in a preheated 325°F oven.
              • When the skin is a light golden color and the turkey is about two-thirds done, shield the breast loosely with a tent of lightweight foil to prevent overcooking of the breast.
              • Use this roasting schedule as a guideline start checking for doneness 1/2 hour before recommended end times:
                Net Weight (in pounds) (in hours)
                10 to 18 lbs.: 3 to 3-1/2 hours, unstuffed 3-3/4 to 4-1/2 hours, stuffed
                18 to 22 lbs.: 3-1/2 to 4 4-1/2 hours, unstuffed to 4-1/2 to 5 hours, stuffed
                22 to 24 lbs.: 4 to 4-1/2 hours, unstuffed 5 to 5-1/2 hours, stuffed
                24 to 30 lbs.: 4-1/2 to 5 hours, unstuffed 5-1/2 to 6-1/4 hours, stuffed
              • Turkey is done when the meat thermometer reaches the following temperatures:
                • 180 to 185°F deep in the thigh also, juices should be clear, not pink when thigh muscle is pierced deeply.
                • 170 to 175°F in the thickest part of the breast, just above the rib bones.
                • 160 to 165°F in the center of the stuffing, if turkey is stuffed.
                • If stuffed, the tip of the meat thermometer should be placed inside the stuffed cavity of the turkey. If unstuffed, the tip of the meat thermometer should be placed in the thigh muscle just above and beyond the lower part of the thigh bone, but not touching the bone, and pointing toward the body.
                • If using an oven-safe meat thermometer, insert the thermometer prior to placing the turkey in the oven and leave in while the turkey is roasting. Turn the thermometer so it can be read while the turkey is in the oven.
                • If using an instant-read meat thermometer, do not leave the thermometer in the turkey during roasting.

                Within two hours after roasting, remove stuffing from turkey and carve the meat off the bones, then store in refrigerator or freezer.

                • Wrap turkey slices and stuffing separately and use within three days.
                • Wrap in heavy foil, freezer wrap or place in freezer container for optimum flavor, use stuffing within one month and turkey within two months.
                • 180 to 185°F deep in the thigh also, juices should be clear, not pink when thigh muscle is pierced deeply.
                • 160 °F in the center of the stuffing, if turkey is stuffed.

                Generations of Americans have been enjoying turkeys -- stuffed and unstuffed. Whether you choose to stuff your turkey or cook stuffing in a casserole dish is a matter of personal preference. As with any preparation involving raw food ingredients, it's important to carefully follow proper food safety and handling procedures to ensure a safe turkey every time. For consumers who choose to stuff their turkey, we recommend the following four guidelines.

                • Prepare stuffing just before placing in turkey. Use only cooked ingredients in stuffing -- saute vegetables, use only cooked meats and seafood (oysters) and use pasteurized egg products instead of raw eggs. Place prepared stuffing in turkey just before roasting. Do not stuff the turkey the night before roasting.
                • Stuff both neck and body cavities of completely thawed turkey, allowing 1/2 to 3/4 cup of stuffing per pound of turkey. Do not pack stuffing tightly in turkey.
                • Always use a meat thermometer. The turkey is done when the thigh temperature reaches 180°F on a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh next to body, not touching bone. Move the meat thermometer to the center of stuffing temperature should be 160°F. When the stuffed turkey is done, remove turkey from oven and let turkey with stuffing stand 15 minutes. This stand time allows the stuffing temperature to reach 165°F.for an added measure of safety
                • If you have additional questions call the experts at the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line at 1-800-323-4848. Specially trained home economists will be ready and waiting to take America's calls beginning November 1 at 8 a.m. CST.
                • When the turkey is cooked on an outdoor grill, water smoker or by fast cook methods where the turkey typically gets done faster than the stuffing, it is recommended that the turkey not be stuffed.
                • Remove original plastic wrapper from thawed or fresh turkey.
                • Remove the neck and giblets from the body and neck cavities.
                • Drain juices and blot turkey dry with paper towels.
                • Stuff the turkey (optional) just before roasting ingredients may be prepared earlier, but keep moist and dry ingredients separate and combine just before stuffing.
                • Return legs to tucked position, if untucked for cleaning or stuffing.
                • Insert oven-safe meat thermometer into the deepest part of the thigh.
                • Brush with oil to prevent drying of the skin.
                • Follow roasting directions that come with every Butterball turkey.
                • Selecting a fresh or frozen turkey is your choice.
                • Fresh turkeys need no thawing and are ready to cook.
                • Frozen turkeys can be purchased months in advance, but plan enough thawing time before roasting.
                • Fresh, non-basted Butterball Turkeys are all-natural.
                • The breast meat of frozen Butterball Turkeys has been deep-basted for juiciness.

                No. Basting throughout the roasting process is unnecessary. Pouring juices over a turkey's surface while it roasts will not make the meat juicier. The liquid penetrates only about 1/8 to 1/4 of an inch beneath the skin and most of the juice will run off into the pan. Opening the oven door periodically to baste a turkey can cool the oven and possibly lengthen the roasting time. Before roasting, lightly coat the turkey's skin with oil, shortening or vegetable cooking spray to prevent the skin from drying.


                I Went to Butterball University, and This Is What I Learned - Recipes

                The Butterball Turkey Talk-Line is available to smooth ruffled feathers by providing one-on-one turkey advice. Every November and December, the Talk-Line's more than 50 professionally trained home economists respond to more than 100,000 inquiries on virtually every turkey topic, from thawing to carving. Below are the ten most commonly asked questions from recent years.

                1. WHAT'S THE BEST WAY TO THAW A TURKEY? (13,276 questions)

                Refrigerator thawing is recommended. However, if short on time, submerge the turkey in cold water. Thawing turkey at room temperature allows bacterial growth and is not recommended.

                Refrigerator Thawing:
                Thaw breast side up in its unopened wrapper on a tray in the refrigerator. Allow at least one day of thawing for every four pounds of turkey.


                Cold Water Thawing:
                Place breast down in its unopened wrapper in cold water to cover. Change the water every 30 minutes to keep surface cold. Estimate minimum thawing time to be 30 minutes per pound for whole turkey.

                2. HOW DO YOU RECOMMEND HANDLING A TURKEY SO IT'S SAFE TO EAT? (12,929 questions)

                Follow these food safety guidelines. Refer to specific categories for additional directions.

                • Thaw frozen turkey in the refrigerator or cold water.
                • Keep thawed or fresh turkey in a refrigerator.
                • Prevent juices from dripping onto other foods in the refrigerator by placing wrapped turkey on a tray.
                • Thawed turkey may be kept in a refrigerator up to four days before cooking.
                • Roast fresh turkey as soon as possible, but no later than the use by date on the package.
                • Place raw poultry on non-porous surfaces these are easy to clean. It is recommended that two cutting boards are used: one strictly to cut raw meats and the other for ready-to-eat foods, such as breads, fruits, and vegetables. If using one cutting board, be sure it is used for raw meats only. Cutting boards should be washed thoroughly in hot, soapy water before and after each use, and allowed to air dry or patted dry with fresh paper towels.
                • Use paper towels, not cloth, to dry off turkey and wipe up juices.
                • Combine stuffing ingredients and stuff turkey just before roasting, not the night before.
                • Wash hands, work surfaces and utensils touched by raw poultry and its juices with hot, soapy water.
                • Use cooking methods that allow turkey to reach an internal temperature of 140°F in less than four hours. Avoid using low roasting temperatures or partial cooking methods.
                • Use a meat thermometer to determine turkey's doneness.
                • Store turkey, stuffing, gravy, broth and other cooked foods properly within two hours after cooking.

                The Butterball Open Pan Roasting Method will consistently create a juicy, tender, golden brown, picture-perfect turkey.

                • Place thawed or fresh turkey, breast up, on a flat rack in a shallow pan, 2 to 2-1/2 inches deep.
                • Insert oven-safe meat thermometer into the thickest part of the thigh.
                • Brush or rub skin with oil to prevent drying of the skin and to enhance the golden color.
                • Place in a preheated 325°F oven.
                • When the skin is a light golden color and the turkey is about two-thirds done, shield the breast loosely with a tent of lightweight foil to prevent overcooking of the breast.
                • Use this roasting schedule as a guideline start checking for doneness 1/2 hour before recommended end times:
                  Net Weight (in pounds) (in hours)
                  10 to 18 lbs.: 3 to 3-1/2 hours, unstuffed 3-3/4 to 4-1/2 hours, stuffed
                  18 to 22 lbs.: 3-1/2 to 4 4-1/2 hours, unstuffed to 4-1/2 to 5 hours, stuffed
                  22 to 24 lbs.: 4 to 4-1/2 hours, unstuffed 5 to 5-1/2 hours, stuffed
                  24 to 30 lbs.: 4-1/2 to 5 hours, unstuffed 5-1/2 to 6-1/4 hours, stuffed
                • Turkey is done when the meat thermometer reaches the following temperatures:
                  • 180 to 185°F deep in the thigh also, juices should be clear, not pink when thigh muscle is pierced deeply.
                  • 170 to 175°F in the thickest part of the breast, just above the rib bones.
                  • 160 to 165°F in the center of the stuffing, if turkey is stuffed.
                  • If stuffed, the tip of the meat thermometer should be placed inside the stuffed cavity of the turkey. If unstuffed, the tip of the meat thermometer should be placed in the thigh muscle just above and beyond the lower part of the thigh bone, but not touching the bone, and pointing toward the body.
                  • If using an oven-safe meat thermometer, insert the thermometer prior to placing the turkey in the oven and leave in while the turkey is roasting. Turn the thermometer so it can be read while the turkey is in the oven.
                  • If using an instant-read meat thermometer, do not leave the thermometer in the turkey during roasting.

                  Within two hours after roasting, remove stuffing from turkey and carve the meat off the bones, then store in refrigerator or freezer.

                  • Wrap turkey slices and stuffing separately and use within three days.
                  • Wrap in heavy foil, freezer wrap or place in freezer container for optimum flavor, use stuffing within one month and turkey within two months.
                  • 180 to 185°F deep in the thigh also, juices should be clear, not pink when thigh muscle is pierced deeply.
                  • 160 °F in the center of the stuffing, if turkey is stuffed.

                  Generations of Americans have been enjoying turkeys -- stuffed and unstuffed. Whether you choose to stuff your turkey or cook stuffing in a casserole dish is a matter of personal preference. As with any preparation involving raw food ingredients, it's important to carefully follow proper food safety and handling procedures to ensure a safe turkey every time. For consumers who choose to stuff their turkey, we recommend the following four guidelines.

                  • Prepare stuffing just before placing in turkey. Use only cooked ingredients in stuffing -- saute vegetables, use only cooked meats and seafood (oysters) and use pasteurized egg products instead of raw eggs. Place prepared stuffing in turkey just before roasting. Do not stuff the turkey the night before roasting.
                  • Stuff both neck and body cavities of completely thawed turkey, allowing 1/2 to 3/4 cup of stuffing per pound of turkey. Do not pack stuffing tightly in turkey.
                  • Always use a meat thermometer. The turkey is done when the thigh temperature reaches 180°F on a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh next to body, not touching bone. Move the meat thermometer to the center of stuffing temperature should be 160°F. When the stuffed turkey is done, remove turkey from oven and let turkey with stuffing stand 15 minutes. This stand time allows the stuffing temperature to reach 165°F.for an added measure of safety
                  • If you have additional questions call the experts at the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line at 1-800-323-4848. Specially trained home economists will be ready and waiting to take America's calls beginning November 1 at 8 a.m. CST.
                  • When the turkey is cooked on an outdoor grill, water smoker or by fast cook methods where the turkey typically gets done faster than the stuffing, it is recommended that the turkey not be stuffed.
                  • Remove original plastic wrapper from thawed or fresh turkey.
                  • Remove the neck and giblets from the body and neck cavities.
                  • Drain juices and blot turkey dry with paper towels.
                  • Stuff the turkey (optional) just before roasting ingredients may be prepared earlier, but keep moist and dry ingredients separate and combine just before stuffing.
                  • Return legs to tucked position, if untucked for cleaning or stuffing.
                  • Insert oven-safe meat thermometer into the deepest part of the thigh.
                  • Brush with oil to prevent drying of the skin.
                  • Follow roasting directions that come with every Butterball turkey.
                  • Selecting a fresh or frozen turkey is your choice.
                  • Fresh turkeys need no thawing and are ready to cook.
                  • Frozen turkeys can be purchased months in advance, but plan enough thawing time before roasting.
                  • Fresh, non-basted Butterball Turkeys are all-natural.
                  • The breast meat of frozen Butterball Turkeys has been deep-basted for juiciness.

                  No. Basting throughout the roasting process is unnecessary. Pouring juices over a turkey's surface while it roasts will not make the meat juicier. The liquid penetrates only about 1/8 to 1/4 of an inch beneath the skin and most of the juice will run off into the pan. Opening the oven door periodically to baste a turkey can cool the oven and possibly lengthen the roasting time. Before roasting, lightly coat the turkey's skin with oil, shortening or vegetable cooking spray to prevent the skin from drying.


                  I Went to Butterball University, and This Is What I Learned - Recipes

                  The Butterball Turkey Talk-Line is available to smooth ruffled feathers by providing one-on-one turkey advice. Every November and December, the Talk-Line's more than 50 professionally trained home economists respond to more than 100,000 inquiries on virtually every turkey topic, from thawing to carving. Below are the ten most commonly asked questions from recent years.

                  1. WHAT'S THE BEST WAY TO THAW A TURKEY? (13,276 questions)

                  Refrigerator thawing is recommended. However, if short on time, submerge the turkey in cold water. Thawing turkey at room temperature allows bacterial growth and is not recommended.

                  Refrigerator Thawing:
                  Thaw breast side up in its unopened wrapper on a tray in the refrigerator. Allow at least one day of thawing for every four pounds of turkey.


                  Cold Water Thawing:
                  Place breast down in its unopened wrapper in cold water to cover. Change the water every 30 minutes to keep surface cold. Estimate minimum thawing time to be 30 minutes per pound for whole turkey.

                  2. HOW DO YOU RECOMMEND HANDLING A TURKEY SO IT'S SAFE TO EAT? (12,929 questions)

                  Follow these food safety guidelines. Refer to specific categories for additional directions.

                  • Thaw frozen turkey in the refrigerator or cold water.
                  • Keep thawed or fresh turkey in a refrigerator.
                  • Prevent juices from dripping onto other foods in the refrigerator by placing wrapped turkey on a tray.
                  • Thawed turkey may be kept in a refrigerator up to four days before cooking.
                  • Roast fresh turkey as soon as possible, but no later than the use by date on the package.
                  • Place raw poultry on non-porous surfaces these are easy to clean. It is recommended that two cutting boards are used: one strictly to cut raw meats and the other for ready-to-eat foods, such as breads, fruits, and vegetables. If using one cutting board, be sure it is used for raw meats only. Cutting boards should be washed thoroughly in hot, soapy water before and after each use, and allowed to air dry or patted dry with fresh paper towels.
                  • Use paper towels, not cloth, to dry off turkey and wipe up juices.
                  • Combine stuffing ingredients and stuff turkey just before roasting, not the night before.
                  • Wash hands, work surfaces and utensils touched by raw poultry and its juices with hot, soapy water.
                  • Use cooking methods that allow turkey to reach an internal temperature of 140°F in less than four hours. Avoid using low roasting temperatures or partial cooking methods.
                  • Use a meat thermometer to determine turkey's doneness.
                  • Store turkey, stuffing, gravy, broth and other cooked foods properly within two hours after cooking.

                  The Butterball Open Pan Roasting Method will consistently create a juicy, tender, golden brown, picture-perfect turkey.

                  • Place thawed or fresh turkey, breast up, on a flat rack in a shallow pan, 2 to 2-1/2 inches deep.
                  • Insert oven-safe meat thermometer into the thickest part of the thigh.
                  • Brush or rub skin with oil to prevent drying of the skin and to enhance the golden color.
                  • Place in a preheated 325°F oven.
                  • When the skin is a light golden color and the turkey is about two-thirds done, shield the breast loosely with a tent of lightweight foil to prevent overcooking of the breast.
                  • Use this roasting schedule as a guideline start checking for doneness 1/2 hour before recommended end times:
                    Net Weight (in pounds) (in hours)
                    10 to 18 lbs.: 3 to 3-1/2 hours, unstuffed 3-3/4 to 4-1/2 hours, stuffed
                    18 to 22 lbs.: 3-1/2 to 4 4-1/2 hours, unstuffed to 4-1/2 to 5 hours, stuffed
                    22 to 24 lbs.: 4 to 4-1/2 hours, unstuffed 5 to 5-1/2 hours, stuffed
                    24 to 30 lbs.: 4-1/2 to 5 hours, unstuffed 5-1/2 to 6-1/4 hours, stuffed
                  • Turkey is done when the meat thermometer reaches the following temperatures:
                    • 180 to 185°F deep in the thigh also, juices should be clear, not pink when thigh muscle is pierced deeply.
                    • 170 to 175°F in the thickest part of the breast, just above the rib bones.
                    • 160 to 165°F in the center of the stuffing, if turkey is stuffed.
                    • If stuffed, the tip of the meat thermometer should be placed inside the stuffed cavity of the turkey. If unstuffed, the tip of the meat thermometer should be placed in the thigh muscle just above and beyond the lower part of the thigh bone, but not touching the bone, and pointing toward the body.
                    • If using an oven-safe meat thermometer, insert the thermometer prior to placing the turkey in the oven and leave in while the turkey is roasting. Turn the thermometer so it can be read while the turkey is in the oven.
                    • If using an instant-read meat thermometer, do not leave the thermometer in the turkey during roasting.

                    Within two hours after roasting, remove stuffing from turkey and carve the meat off the bones, then store in refrigerator or freezer.

                    • Wrap turkey slices and stuffing separately and use within three days.
                    • Wrap in heavy foil, freezer wrap or place in freezer container for optimum flavor, use stuffing within one month and turkey within two months.
                    • 180 to 185°F deep in the thigh also, juices should be clear, not pink when thigh muscle is pierced deeply.
                    • 160 °F in the center of the stuffing, if turkey is stuffed.

                    Generations of Americans have been enjoying turkeys -- stuffed and unstuffed. Whether you choose to stuff your turkey or cook stuffing in a casserole dish is a matter of personal preference. As with any preparation involving raw food ingredients, it's important to carefully follow proper food safety and handling procedures to ensure a safe turkey every time. For consumers who choose to stuff their turkey, we recommend the following four guidelines.

                    • Prepare stuffing just before placing in turkey. Use only cooked ingredients in stuffing -- saute vegetables, use only cooked meats and seafood (oysters) and use pasteurized egg products instead of raw eggs. Place prepared stuffing in turkey just before roasting. Do not stuff the turkey the night before roasting.
                    • Stuff both neck and body cavities of completely thawed turkey, allowing 1/2 to 3/4 cup of stuffing per pound of turkey. Do not pack stuffing tightly in turkey.
                    • Always use a meat thermometer. The turkey is done when the thigh temperature reaches 180°F on a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh next to body, not touching bone. Move the meat thermometer to the center of stuffing temperature should be 160°F. When the stuffed turkey is done, remove turkey from oven and let turkey with stuffing stand 15 minutes. This stand time allows the stuffing temperature to reach 165°F.for an added measure of safety
                    • If you have additional questions call the experts at the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line at 1-800-323-4848. Specially trained home economists will be ready and waiting to take America's calls beginning November 1 at 8 a.m. CST.
                    • When the turkey is cooked on an outdoor grill, water smoker or by fast cook methods where the turkey typically gets done faster than the stuffing, it is recommended that the turkey not be stuffed.
                    • Remove original plastic wrapper from thawed or fresh turkey.
                    • Remove the neck and giblets from the body and neck cavities.
                    • Drain juices and blot turkey dry with paper towels.
                    • Stuff the turkey (optional) just before roasting ingredients may be prepared earlier, but keep moist and dry ingredients separate and combine just before stuffing.
                    • Return legs to tucked position, if untucked for cleaning or stuffing.
                    • Insert oven-safe meat thermometer into the deepest part of the thigh.
                    • Brush with oil to prevent drying of the skin.
                    • Follow roasting directions that come with every Butterball turkey.
                    • Selecting a fresh or frozen turkey is your choice.
                    • Fresh turkeys need no thawing and are ready to cook.
                    • Frozen turkeys can be purchased months in advance, but plan enough thawing time before roasting.
                    • Fresh, non-basted Butterball Turkeys are all-natural.
                    • The breast meat of frozen Butterball Turkeys has been deep-basted for juiciness.

                    No. Basting throughout the roasting process is unnecessary. Pouring juices over a turkey's surface while it roasts will not make the meat juicier. The liquid penetrates only about 1/8 to 1/4 of an inch beneath the skin and most of the juice will run off into the pan. Opening the oven door periodically to baste a turkey can cool the oven and possibly lengthen the roasting time. Before roasting, lightly coat the turkey's skin with oil, shortening or vegetable cooking spray to prevent the skin from drying.


                    I Went to Butterball University, and This Is What I Learned - Recipes

                    The Butterball Turkey Talk-Line is available to smooth ruffled feathers by providing one-on-one turkey advice. Every November and December, the Talk-Line's more than 50 professionally trained home economists respond to more than 100,000 inquiries on virtually every turkey topic, from thawing to carving. Below are the ten most commonly asked questions from recent years.

                    1. WHAT'S THE BEST WAY TO THAW A TURKEY? (13,276 questions)

                    Refrigerator thawing is recommended. However, if short on time, submerge the turkey in cold water. Thawing turkey at room temperature allows bacterial growth and is not recommended.

                    Refrigerator Thawing:
                    Thaw breast side up in its unopened wrapper on a tray in the refrigerator. Allow at least one day of thawing for every four pounds of turkey.


                    Cold Water Thawing:
                    Place breast down in its unopened wrapper in cold water to cover. Change the water every 30 minutes to keep surface cold. Estimate minimum thawing time to be 30 minutes per pound for whole turkey.

                    2. HOW DO YOU RECOMMEND HANDLING A TURKEY SO IT'S SAFE TO EAT? (12,929 questions)

                    Follow these food safety guidelines. Refer to specific categories for additional directions.

                    • Thaw frozen turkey in the refrigerator or cold water.
                    • Keep thawed or fresh turkey in a refrigerator.
                    • Prevent juices from dripping onto other foods in the refrigerator by placing wrapped turkey on a tray.
                    • Thawed turkey may be kept in a refrigerator up to four days before cooking.
                    • Roast fresh turkey as soon as possible, but no later than the use by date on the package.
                    • Place raw poultry on non-porous surfaces these are easy to clean. It is recommended that two cutting boards are used: one strictly to cut raw meats and the other for ready-to-eat foods, such as breads, fruits, and vegetables. If using one cutting board, be sure it is used for raw meats only. Cutting boards should be washed thoroughly in hot, soapy water before and after each use, and allowed to air dry or patted dry with fresh paper towels.
                    • Use paper towels, not cloth, to dry off turkey and wipe up juices.
                    • Combine stuffing ingredients and stuff turkey just before roasting, not the night before.
                    • Wash hands, work surfaces and utensils touched by raw poultry and its juices with hot, soapy water.
                    • Use cooking methods that allow turkey to reach an internal temperature of 140°F in less than four hours. Avoid using low roasting temperatures or partial cooking methods.
                    • Use a meat thermometer to determine turkey's doneness.
                    • Store turkey, stuffing, gravy, broth and other cooked foods properly within two hours after cooking.

                    The Butterball Open Pan Roasting Method will consistently create a juicy, tender, golden brown, picture-perfect turkey.

                    • Place thawed or fresh turkey, breast up, on a flat rack in a shallow pan, 2 to 2-1/2 inches deep.
                    • Insert oven-safe meat thermometer into the thickest part of the thigh.
                    • Brush or rub skin with oil to prevent drying of the skin and to enhance the golden color.
                    • Place in a preheated 325°F oven.
                    • When the skin is a light golden color and the turkey is about two-thirds done, shield the breast loosely with a tent of lightweight foil to prevent overcooking of the breast.
                    • Use this roasting schedule as a guideline start checking for doneness 1/2 hour before recommended end times:
                      Net Weight (in pounds) (in hours)
                      10 to 18 lbs.: 3 to 3-1/2 hours, unstuffed 3-3/4 to 4-1/2 hours, stuffed
                      18 to 22 lbs.: 3-1/2 to 4 4-1/2 hours, unstuffed to 4-1/2 to 5 hours, stuffed
                      22 to 24 lbs.: 4 to 4-1/2 hours, unstuffed 5 to 5-1/2 hours, stuffed
                      24 to 30 lbs.: 4-1/2 to 5 hours, unstuffed 5-1/2 to 6-1/4 hours, stuffed
                    • Turkey is done when the meat thermometer reaches the following temperatures:
                      • 180 to 185°F deep in the thigh also, juices should be clear, not pink when thigh muscle is pierced deeply.
                      • 170 to 175°F in the thickest part of the breast, just above the rib bones.
                      • 160 to 165°F in the center of the stuffing, if turkey is stuffed.
                      • If stuffed, the tip of the meat thermometer should be placed inside the stuffed cavity of the turkey. If unstuffed, the tip of the meat thermometer should be placed in the thigh muscle just above and beyond the lower part of the thigh bone, but not touching the bone, and pointing toward the body.
                      • If using an oven-safe meat thermometer, insert the thermometer prior to placing the turkey in the oven and leave in while the turkey is roasting. Turn the thermometer so it can be read while the turkey is in the oven.
                      • If using an instant-read meat thermometer, do not leave the thermometer in the turkey during roasting.

                      Within two hours after roasting, remove stuffing from turkey and carve the meat off the bones, then store in refrigerator or freezer.

                      • Wrap turkey slices and stuffing separately and use within three days.
                      • Wrap in heavy foil, freezer wrap or place in freezer container for optimum flavor, use stuffing within one month and turkey within two months.
                      • 180 to 185°F deep in the thigh also, juices should be clear, not pink when thigh muscle is pierced deeply.
                      • 160 °F in the center of the stuffing, if turkey is stuffed.

                      Generations of Americans have been enjoying turkeys -- stuffed and unstuffed. Whether you choose to stuff your turkey or cook stuffing in a casserole dish is a matter of personal preference. As with any preparation involving raw food ingredients, it's important to carefully follow proper food safety and handling procedures to ensure a safe turkey every time. For consumers who choose to stuff their turkey, we recommend the following four guidelines.

                      • Prepare stuffing just before placing in turkey. Use only cooked ingredients in stuffing -- saute vegetables, use only cooked meats and seafood (oysters) and use pasteurized egg products instead of raw eggs. Place prepared stuffing in turkey just before roasting. Do not stuff the turkey the night before roasting.
                      • Stuff both neck and body cavities of completely thawed turkey, allowing 1/2 to 3/4 cup of stuffing per pound of turkey. Do not pack stuffing tightly in turkey.
                      • Always use a meat thermometer. The turkey is done when the thigh temperature reaches 180°F on a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh next to body, not touching bone. Move the meat thermometer to the center of stuffing temperature should be 160°F. When the stuffed turkey is done, remove turkey from oven and let turkey with stuffing stand 15 minutes. This stand time allows the stuffing temperature to reach 165°F.for an added measure of safety
                      • If you have additional questions call the experts at the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line at 1-800-323-4848. Specially trained home economists will be ready and waiting to take America's calls beginning November 1 at 8 a.m. CST.
                      • When the turkey is cooked on an outdoor grill, water smoker or by fast cook methods where the turkey typically gets done faster than the stuffing, it is recommended that the turkey not be stuffed.
                      • Remove original plastic wrapper from thawed or fresh turkey.
                      • Remove the neck and giblets from the body and neck cavities.
                      • Drain juices and blot turkey dry with paper towels.
                      • Stuff the turkey (optional) just before roasting ingredients may be prepared earlier, but keep moist and dry ingredients separate and combine just before stuffing.
                      • Return legs to tucked position, if untucked for cleaning or stuffing.
                      • Insert oven-safe meat thermometer into the deepest part of the thigh.
                      • Brush with oil to prevent drying of the skin.
                      • Follow roasting directions that come with every Butterball turkey.
                      • Selecting a fresh or frozen turkey is your choice.
                      • Fresh turkeys need no thawing and are ready to cook.
                      • Frozen turkeys can be purchased months in advance, but plan enough thawing time before roasting.
                      • Fresh, non-basted Butterball Turkeys are all-natural.
                      • The breast meat of frozen Butterball Turkeys has been deep-basted for juiciness.

                      No. Basting throughout the roasting process is unnecessary. Pouring juices over a turkey's surface while it roasts will not make the meat juicier. The liquid penetrates only about 1/8 to 1/4 of an inch beneath the skin and most of the juice will run off into the pan. Opening the oven door periodically to baste a turkey can cool the oven and possibly lengthen the roasting time. Before roasting, lightly coat the turkey's skin with oil, shortening or vegetable cooking spray to prevent the skin from drying.


                      Watch the video: Ένταση στο Πανεπιστήμιο Αθηνών (August 2022).