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Meat Reigns Supreme at NYC Wine & Food Fest’s Meatopia

Meat Reigns Supreme at NYC Wine & Food Fest’s Meatopia


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Meat, meat, and more meat! Carnivores came out in droves on Sunday for the 10th annual Meatopia, hailed as the “Carnivore’s Ball,” presented by Creekstone Farms and hosted by chef Michael Symon. More than 35 of the country’s leading chefs showed off their skills at turning whole hogs, lambs, goats, and an entire steer into delicious dishes, and the event was a smashing success.

For the past nine years, the event has been held separately from the festival, outside of Manhattan and organized by Esquire food writer Josh Ozersky, but this year was its first as an official part of the Food Network New York City Wine & Food Festival.

“It took ten years for this event to pass into transnational greatness, but this is the most amazing one by far,” Ozersky told us. “There’s no way we could have gotten so many amazing participants without being a part of the festival. In the past the event has been in some outer borough hellhole, but this year it’s in a great location, organized in a way I couldn’t myself.”

Chefs on hand included Ateras’s Matt Lightner, Tertulia’s Seamus Mullen, MP Taverna’s Michael Psilakis, Qui’s Paul Qui, VOLT’s Bryan Voltaggio, and Costata’s Michael White, and not only was it an opportunity for them to show off their supreme meat-cooking skills, it also gave them a chance to reconnect with each other.

“Being able to hang out with like-minded friends is the best part of this event,” Toro’s Jamie Bissonette told us, and Dickson’s Farmstead Meats’ Jake Dickson agreed. “They did an amazing job of putting together a great group of people,” he said. “It’s extremely well-executed, and there are amazing chefs here from all over the world.”

All meat needed to come from whole animals in order to make sure that they were utilized from nose to tail, and that commitment was most on display via the showpiece of the event: an entire steer from butcher Pat LaFrieda, slow-roasted in a custom box for 24 hours, then butchered by LaFrieda himself and served by the team from the Beatrice Inn.

Click here for all Food Network New York City Wine & Food Festival Coverage.


Mortadella

View all photos

Place of Origin

Mortadella Bologna IGP bears little resemblance to the rubbery slices of baloney that American schoolchildren pack in their lunches. The original bologna is a pink, watermelon-shaped sausage, composed of finely ground pork, chunks of fat, and an array of spices. In restaurants and markets all over the Italian city of Bologna, the sweet-savory meat is thinly sliced for panini, whipped into mousse for an aperitivo, and used as a stuffing for tortellini pasta.

To make true mortadella Bologna, butchers must first finely pulverize a lean cut of pork shoulder. For sweetness, they’ll mix in myrtle berries and fatty cubes from the animal’s throat. For spice, they’ll sprinkle in seasonings such as pepper, garlic, nutmeg, and pistachios. After stuffing the mixture into oval-shaped casings, they’ll hang the sausages in room-sized ovens for a carefully monitored, slow-cooking session (about 24 hours for a 22-pound mortadella).

Because of the labor-intensive meat-grinding process and pricey spices, mortadella was initially reserved for nobility. By the 19th century, however, machinery brought the meat to the masses. Its popularity spread throughout Europe, where it was called la Bologna, and eventually to the United States, where it devolved into the mass-produced distant relative known as baloney.

German immigrants played a key role in bringing “la Bologna” to the States and popularizing its new American adaptation. One such figure was Oscar Mayer. The entrepreneur’s eponymous brand still reigns supreme in the processed meat industry, thanks in part to an incredibly catchy jingle about baloney.

Perhaps the next time you’re choosing a sandwich filling, skip the well-known lunchmeat and opt for its predecessor. Real mortadella Bologna is not only a flavorful choice, but a healthy one. With lean pork and unsaturated fats, it’s often lower in calories than an equivalent turkey slice and a good source of protein.

Need to Know

"IGP" is the Italian abbreviation for "Protected Geographical Indication," the European Union's designation for special regional products. In mortadella's case, it must come from one of seven distinct Italian regions (including Emilio-Romagna, of which Bologna is the capital). Two top Bologna producers are Felsineo and Alcisa.

Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of Gastro Obscura in your inbox.


Mortadella

View all photos

Place of Origin

Mortadella Bologna IGP bears little resemblance to the rubbery slices of baloney that American schoolchildren pack in their lunches. The original bologna is a pink, watermelon-shaped sausage, composed of finely ground pork, chunks of fat, and an array of spices. In restaurants and markets all over the Italian city of Bologna, the sweet-savory meat is thinly sliced for panini, whipped into mousse for an aperitivo, and used as a stuffing for tortellini pasta.

To make true mortadella Bologna, butchers must first finely pulverize a lean cut of pork shoulder. For sweetness, they’ll mix in myrtle berries and fatty cubes from the animal’s throat. For spice, they’ll sprinkle in seasonings such as pepper, garlic, nutmeg, and pistachios. After stuffing the mixture into oval-shaped casings, they’ll hang the sausages in room-sized ovens for a carefully monitored, slow-cooking session (about 24 hours for a 22-pound mortadella).

Because of the labor-intensive meat-grinding process and pricey spices, mortadella was initially reserved for nobility. By the 19th century, however, machinery brought the meat to the masses. Its popularity spread throughout Europe, where it was called la Bologna, and eventually to the United States, where it devolved into the mass-produced distant relative known as baloney.

German immigrants played a key role in bringing “la Bologna” to the States and popularizing its new American adaptation. One such figure was Oscar Mayer. The entrepreneur’s eponymous brand still reigns supreme in the processed meat industry, thanks in part to an incredibly catchy jingle about baloney.

Perhaps the next time you’re choosing a sandwich filling, skip the well-known lunchmeat and opt for its predecessor. Real mortadella Bologna is not only a flavorful choice, but a healthy one. With lean pork and unsaturated fats, it’s often lower in calories than an equivalent turkey slice and a good source of protein.

Need to Know

"IGP" is the Italian abbreviation for "Protected Geographical Indication," the European Union's designation for special regional products. In mortadella's case, it must come from one of seven distinct Italian regions (including Emilio-Romagna, of which Bologna is the capital). Two top Bologna producers are Felsineo and Alcisa.

Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of Gastro Obscura in your inbox.


Mortadella

View all photos

Place of Origin

Mortadella Bologna IGP bears little resemblance to the rubbery slices of baloney that American schoolchildren pack in their lunches. The original bologna is a pink, watermelon-shaped sausage, composed of finely ground pork, chunks of fat, and an array of spices. In restaurants and markets all over the Italian city of Bologna, the sweet-savory meat is thinly sliced for panini, whipped into mousse for an aperitivo, and used as a stuffing for tortellini pasta.

To make true mortadella Bologna, butchers must first finely pulverize a lean cut of pork shoulder. For sweetness, they’ll mix in myrtle berries and fatty cubes from the animal’s throat. For spice, they’ll sprinkle in seasonings such as pepper, garlic, nutmeg, and pistachios. After stuffing the mixture into oval-shaped casings, they’ll hang the sausages in room-sized ovens for a carefully monitored, slow-cooking session (about 24 hours for a 22-pound mortadella).

Because of the labor-intensive meat-grinding process and pricey spices, mortadella was initially reserved for nobility. By the 19th century, however, machinery brought the meat to the masses. Its popularity spread throughout Europe, where it was called la Bologna, and eventually to the United States, where it devolved into the mass-produced distant relative known as baloney.

German immigrants played a key role in bringing “la Bologna” to the States and popularizing its new American adaptation. One such figure was Oscar Mayer. The entrepreneur’s eponymous brand still reigns supreme in the processed meat industry, thanks in part to an incredibly catchy jingle about baloney.

Perhaps the next time you’re choosing a sandwich filling, skip the well-known lunchmeat and opt for its predecessor. Real mortadella Bologna is not only a flavorful choice, but a healthy one. With lean pork and unsaturated fats, it’s often lower in calories than an equivalent turkey slice and a good source of protein.

Need to Know

"IGP" is the Italian abbreviation for "Protected Geographical Indication," the European Union's designation for special regional products. In mortadella's case, it must come from one of seven distinct Italian regions (including Emilio-Romagna, of which Bologna is the capital). Two top Bologna producers are Felsineo and Alcisa.

Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of Gastro Obscura in your inbox.


Mortadella

View all photos

Place of Origin

Mortadella Bologna IGP bears little resemblance to the rubbery slices of baloney that American schoolchildren pack in their lunches. The original bologna is a pink, watermelon-shaped sausage, composed of finely ground pork, chunks of fat, and an array of spices. In restaurants and markets all over the Italian city of Bologna, the sweet-savory meat is thinly sliced for panini, whipped into mousse for an aperitivo, and used as a stuffing for tortellini pasta.

To make true mortadella Bologna, butchers must first finely pulverize a lean cut of pork shoulder. For sweetness, they’ll mix in myrtle berries and fatty cubes from the animal’s throat. For spice, they’ll sprinkle in seasonings such as pepper, garlic, nutmeg, and pistachios. After stuffing the mixture into oval-shaped casings, they’ll hang the sausages in room-sized ovens for a carefully monitored, slow-cooking session (about 24 hours for a 22-pound mortadella).

Because of the labor-intensive meat-grinding process and pricey spices, mortadella was initially reserved for nobility. By the 19th century, however, machinery brought the meat to the masses. Its popularity spread throughout Europe, where it was called la Bologna, and eventually to the United States, where it devolved into the mass-produced distant relative known as baloney.

German immigrants played a key role in bringing “la Bologna” to the States and popularizing its new American adaptation. One such figure was Oscar Mayer. The entrepreneur’s eponymous brand still reigns supreme in the processed meat industry, thanks in part to an incredibly catchy jingle about baloney.

Perhaps the next time you’re choosing a sandwich filling, skip the well-known lunchmeat and opt for its predecessor. Real mortadella Bologna is not only a flavorful choice, but a healthy one. With lean pork and unsaturated fats, it’s often lower in calories than an equivalent turkey slice and a good source of protein.

Need to Know

"IGP" is the Italian abbreviation for "Protected Geographical Indication," the European Union's designation for special regional products. In mortadella's case, it must come from one of seven distinct Italian regions (including Emilio-Romagna, of which Bologna is the capital). Two top Bologna producers are Felsineo and Alcisa.

Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of Gastro Obscura in your inbox.


Mortadella

View all photos

Place of Origin

Mortadella Bologna IGP bears little resemblance to the rubbery slices of baloney that American schoolchildren pack in their lunches. The original bologna is a pink, watermelon-shaped sausage, composed of finely ground pork, chunks of fat, and an array of spices. In restaurants and markets all over the Italian city of Bologna, the sweet-savory meat is thinly sliced for panini, whipped into mousse for an aperitivo, and used as a stuffing for tortellini pasta.

To make true mortadella Bologna, butchers must first finely pulverize a lean cut of pork shoulder. For sweetness, they’ll mix in myrtle berries and fatty cubes from the animal’s throat. For spice, they’ll sprinkle in seasonings such as pepper, garlic, nutmeg, and pistachios. After stuffing the mixture into oval-shaped casings, they’ll hang the sausages in room-sized ovens for a carefully monitored, slow-cooking session (about 24 hours for a 22-pound mortadella).

Because of the labor-intensive meat-grinding process and pricey spices, mortadella was initially reserved for nobility. By the 19th century, however, machinery brought the meat to the masses. Its popularity spread throughout Europe, where it was called la Bologna, and eventually to the United States, where it devolved into the mass-produced distant relative known as baloney.

German immigrants played a key role in bringing “la Bologna” to the States and popularizing its new American adaptation. One such figure was Oscar Mayer. The entrepreneur’s eponymous brand still reigns supreme in the processed meat industry, thanks in part to an incredibly catchy jingle about baloney.

Perhaps the next time you’re choosing a sandwich filling, skip the well-known lunchmeat and opt for its predecessor. Real mortadella Bologna is not only a flavorful choice, but a healthy one. With lean pork and unsaturated fats, it’s often lower in calories than an equivalent turkey slice and a good source of protein.

Need to Know

"IGP" is the Italian abbreviation for "Protected Geographical Indication," the European Union's designation for special regional products. In mortadella's case, it must come from one of seven distinct Italian regions (including Emilio-Romagna, of which Bologna is the capital). Two top Bologna producers are Felsineo and Alcisa.

Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of Gastro Obscura in your inbox.


Mortadella

View all photos

Place of Origin

Mortadella Bologna IGP bears little resemblance to the rubbery slices of baloney that American schoolchildren pack in their lunches. The original bologna is a pink, watermelon-shaped sausage, composed of finely ground pork, chunks of fat, and an array of spices. In restaurants and markets all over the Italian city of Bologna, the sweet-savory meat is thinly sliced for panini, whipped into mousse for an aperitivo, and used as a stuffing for tortellini pasta.

To make true mortadella Bologna, butchers must first finely pulverize a lean cut of pork shoulder. For sweetness, they’ll mix in myrtle berries and fatty cubes from the animal’s throat. For spice, they’ll sprinkle in seasonings such as pepper, garlic, nutmeg, and pistachios. After stuffing the mixture into oval-shaped casings, they’ll hang the sausages in room-sized ovens for a carefully monitored, slow-cooking session (about 24 hours for a 22-pound mortadella).

Because of the labor-intensive meat-grinding process and pricey spices, mortadella was initially reserved for nobility. By the 19th century, however, machinery brought the meat to the masses. Its popularity spread throughout Europe, where it was called la Bologna, and eventually to the United States, where it devolved into the mass-produced distant relative known as baloney.

German immigrants played a key role in bringing “la Bologna” to the States and popularizing its new American adaptation. One such figure was Oscar Mayer. The entrepreneur’s eponymous brand still reigns supreme in the processed meat industry, thanks in part to an incredibly catchy jingle about baloney.

Perhaps the next time you’re choosing a sandwich filling, skip the well-known lunchmeat and opt for its predecessor. Real mortadella Bologna is not only a flavorful choice, but a healthy one. With lean pork and unsaturated fats, it’s often lower in calories than an equivalent turkey slice and a good source of protein.

Need to Know

"IGP" is the Italian abbreviation for "Protected Geographical Indication," the European Union's designation for special regional products. In mortadella's case, it must come from one of seven distinct Italian regions (including Emilio-Romagna, of which Bologna is the capital). Two top Bologna producers are Felsineo and Alcisa.

Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of Gastro Obscura in your inbox.


Mortadella

View all photos

Place of Origin

Mortadella Bologna IGP bears little resemblance to the rubbery slices of baloney that American schoolchildren pack in their lunches. The original bologna is a pink, watermelon-shaped sausage, composed of finely ground pork, chunks of fat, and an array of spices. In restaurants and markets all over the Italian city of Bologna, the sweet-savory meat is thinly sliced for panini, whipped into mousse for an aperitivo, and used as a stuffing for tortellini pasta.

To make true mortadella Bologna, butchers must first finely pulverize a lean cut of pork shoulder. For sweetness, they’ll mix in myrtle berries and fatty cubes from the animal’s throat. For spice, they’ll sprinkle in seasonings such as pepper, garlic, nutmeg, and pistachios. After stuffing the mixture into oval-shaped casings, they’ll hang the sausages in room-sized ovens for a carefully monitored, slow-cooking session (about 24 hours for a 22-pound mortadella).

Because of the labor-intensive meat-grinding process and pricey spices, mortadella was initially reserved for nobility. By the 19th century, however, machinery brought the meat to the masses. Its popularity spread throughout Europe, where it was called la Bologna, and eventually to the United States, where it devolved into the mass-produced distant relative known as baloney.

German immigrants played a key role in bringing “la Bologna” to the States and popularizing its new American adaptation. One such figure was Oscar Mayer. The entrepreneur’s eponymous brand still reigns supreme in the processed meat industry, thanks in part to an incredibly catchy jingle about baloney.

Perhaps the next time you’re choosing a sandwich filling, skip the well-known lunchmeat and opt for its predecessor. Real mortadella Bologna is not only a flavorful choice, but a healthy one. With lean pork and unsaturated fats, it’s often lower in calories than an equivalent turkey slice and a good source of protein.

Need to Know

"IGP" is the Italian abbreviation for "Protected Geographical Indication," the European Union's designation for special regional products. In mortadella's case, it must come from one of seven distinct Italian regions (including Emilio-Romagna, of which Bologna is the capital). Two top Bologna producers are Felsineo and Alcisa.

Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of Gastro Obscura in your inbox.


Mortadella

View all photos

Place of Origin

Mortadella Bologna IGP bears little resemblance to the rubbery slices of baloney that American schoolchildren pack in their lunches. The original bologna is a pink, watermelon-shaped sausage, composed of finely ground pork, chunks of fat, and an array of spices. In restaurants and markets all over the Italian city of Bologna, the sweet-savory meat is thinly sliced for panini, whipped into mousse for an aperitivo, and used as a stuffing for tortellini pasta.

To make true mortadella Bologna, butchers must first finely pulverize a lean cut of pork shoulder. For sweetness, they’ll mix in myrtle berries and fatty cubes from the animal’s throat. For spice, they’ll sprinkle in seasonings such as pepper, garlic, nutmeg, and pistachios. After stuffing the mixture into oval-shaped casings, they’ll hang the sausages in room-sized ovens for a carefully monitored, slow-cooking session (about 24 hours for a 22-pound mortadella).

Because of the labor-intensive meat-grinding process and pricey spices, mortadella was initially reserved for nobility. By the 19th century, however, machinery brought the meat to the masses. Its popularity spread throughout Europe, where it was called la Bologna, and eventually to the United States, where it devolved into the mass-produced distant relative known as baloney.

German immigrants played a key role in bringing “la Bologna” to the States and popularizing its new American adaptation. One such figure was Oscar Mayer. The entrepreneur’s eponymous brand still reigns supreme in the processed meat industry, thanks in part to an incredibly catchy jingle about baloney.

Perhaps the next time you’re choosing a sandwich filling, skip the well-known lunchmeat and opt for its predecessor. Real mortadella Bologna is not only a flavorful choice, but a healthy one. With lean pork and unsaturated fats, it’s often lower in calories than an equivalent turkey slice and a good source of protein.

Need to Know

"IGP" is the Italian abbreviation for "Protected Geographical Indication," the European Union's designation for special regional products. In mortadella's case, it must come from one of seven distinct Italian regions (including Emilio-Romagna, of which Bologna is the capital). Two top Bologna producers are Felsineo and Alcisa.

Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of Gastro Obscura in your inbox.


Mortadella

View all photos

Place of Origin

Mortadella Bologna IGP bears little resemblance to the rubbery slices of baloney that American schoolchildren pack in their lunches. The original bologna is a pink, watermelon-shaped sausage, composed of finely ground pork, chunks of fat, and an array of spices. In restaurants and markets all over the Italian city of Bologna, the sweet-savory meat is thinly sliced for panini, whipped into mousse for an aperitivo, and used as a stuffing for tortellini pasta.

To make true mortadella Bologna, butchers must first finely pulverize a lean cut of pork shoulder. For sweetness, they’ll mix in myrtle berries and fatty cubes from the animal’s throat. For spice, they’ll sprinkle in seasonings such as pepper, garlic, nutmeg, and pistachios. After stuffing the mixture into oval-shaped casings, they’ll hang the sausages in room-sized ovens for a carefully monitored, slow-cooking session (about 24 hours for a 22-pound mortadella).

Because of the labor-intensive meat-grinding process and pricey spices, mortadella was initially reserved for nobility. By the 19th century, however, machinery brought the meat to the masses. Its popularity spread throughout Europe, where it was called la Bologna, and eventually to the United States, where it devolved into the mass-produced distant relative known as baloney.

German immigrants played a key role in bringing “la Bologna” to the States and popularizing its new American adaptation. One such figure was Oscar Mayer. The entrepreneur’s eponymous brand still reigns supreme in the processed meat industry, thanks in part to an incredibly catchy jingle about baloney.

Perhaps the next time you’re choosing a sandwich filling, skip the well-known lunchmeat and opt for its predecessor. Real mortadella Bologna is not only a flavorful choice, but a healthy one. With lean pork and unsaturated fats, it’s often lower in calories than an equivalent turkey slice and a good source of protein.

Need to Know

"IGP" is the Italian abbreviation for "Protected Geographical Indication," the European Union's designation for special regional products. In mortadella's case, it must come from one of seven distinct Italian regions (including Emilio-Romagna, of which Bologna is the capital). Two top Bologna producers are Felsineo and Alcisa.

Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of Gastro Obscura in your inbox.


Mortadella

View all photos

Place of Origin

Mortadella Bologna IGP bears little resemblance to the rubbery slices of baloney that American schoolchildren pack in their lunches. The original bologna is a pink, watermelon-shaped sausage, composed of finely ground pork, chunks of fat, and an array of spices. In restaurants and markets all over the Italian city of Bologna, the sweet-savory meat is thinly sliced for panini, whipped into mousse for an aperitivo, and used as a stuffing for tortellini pasta.

To make true mortadella Bologna, butchers must first finely pulverize a lean cut of pork shoulder. For sweetness, they’ll mix in myrtle berries and fatty cubes from the animal’s throat. For spice, they’ll sprinkle in seasonings such as pepper, garlic, nutmeg, and pistachios. After stuffing the mixture into oval-shaped casings, they’ll hang the sausages in room-sized ovens for a carefully monitored, slow-cooking session (about 24 hours for a 22-pound mortadella).

Because of the labor-intensive meat-grinding process and pricey spices, mortadella was initially reserved for nobility. By the 19th century, however, machinery brought the meat to the masses. Its popularity spread throughout Europe, where it was called la Bologna, and eventually to the United States, where it devolved into the mass-produced distant relative known as baloney.

German immigrants played a key role in bringing “la Bologna” to the States and popularizing its new American adaptation. One such figure was Oscar Mayer. The entrepreneur’s eponymous brand still reigns supreme in the processed meat industry, thanks in part to an incredibly catchy jingle about baloney.

Perhaps the next time you’re choosing a sandwich filling, skip the well-known lunchmeat and opt for its predecessor. Real mortadella Bologna is not only a flavorful choice, but a healthy one. With lean pork and unsaturated fats, it’s often lower in calories than an equivalent turkey slice and a good source of protein.

Need to Know

"IGP" is the Italian abbreviation for "Protected Geographical Indication," the European Union's designation for special regional products. In mortadella's case, it must come from one of seven distinct Italian regions (including Emilio-Romagna, of which Bologna is the capital). Two top Bologna producers are Felsineo and Alcisa.

Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of Gastro Obscura in your inbox.


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